Annual programs

The Weber symposium

October 1, 2013: Matthew Yglesias

Matthew Yglesias is the business and economics correspondent for Slate magazine. Before joining Slate he worked for ThinkProgress, the Atlantic, TPM Media, and the American Prospect. His first book, Heads in the Sand, was published by Wiley in 2008. His second,The Rent Is Too Damn High, was published by Simon & Schuster in March 2012.


November 27, 2012: JAMES SUROWIECKI

James Surowiecki has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 2000. He writes The Financial Page.

Surowiecki came to The New Yorker from Slate, where he wrote the Moneybox column. He has also been a contributing editor at Fortune and a staff writer at Talk. Previously, he was the business columnist for New York magazine. He has contributed to The Wall Street Journal, Wired, the New York Times Magazine, the Washington Post, and Lingua Franca, and has written on subjects ranging from Silicon Valley to college basketball. His book, The Wisdom of Crowds: Why the Many Are Smarter than the Few and How Collective Wisdom Shapes Business, Economies, Societies, and Nations, was published in 2004.


December 5, 2011: JOE NOCERA

Joe Nocera is business columnist for The New York Times and also contributes to The New York Times Magazine as a business writer. In addition to his work at The Times, he serves as a regular business commentator for NPR's Weekend Edition with Scott Simon. Before joining The Times, Mr. Nocera spent 10 years at Fortune Magazine, where he held a variety of positions, including contributing writer, editor-at-large and executive editor. His last position at Fortune was editorial director. He was the Profit Motive columnist at GQ until May 1995, and he wrote the same column for Esquire from 1988 until 1990. In the 1980's, he served as a contributing editor at Newsweek, as executive editor of New England Monthly and as senior editor at Texas Monthly. From 1978 until 1980, he was an editor at The Washington Monthly. Mr. Nocera's Saturday column, "Talking Business," ranges widely over the world of business, covering everything from Home Depot's annual meeting to Boeing's comeback to his off-beat musings about his broken iPod. Slate magazine says that his column "demystifies the world of business with original thinking, brainy reporting and the ability to see around corners."


October 14, 2010: ANDREW ROSS SORKIN

Andrew Ross Sorkin is a Gerald Loeb Award-winning American journalist and author. He is a financial columnist for The New York Times and is the newspaper's chief mergers and acquisitions reporter. He is also the founder and editor of DealBook, a financial news service, published by The New York Times. Sorkin has appeared on NBC's Today show, Charlie Rose on PBS, PBS' The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer, MSNBC's Hardball and Morning Joe, ABC's Good Morning America, The Chris Matthews Show, HBO's Real Time with Bill Maher, the BBC World Service, Comedy Central's The Daily Show and The Colbert Report, and is a frequent guest host of CNBC's Squawk Box. Sorkin's book on the Wall Street banking crisis, Too Big to Fail: The Inside Story of How Wall Street and Washington Fought to Save the Financial System -- and Themselves, was published by Viking October 20, 2009. It won the 2010 Gerald Loeb Award for best business book of the year, was on the shortlist for the 2010 Samuel Johnson Prize, shortlisted for the 2010 Financial Times and Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year Award, and was on The New York Times Best Seller list for six months.


October 22, 2009: Larry Summers

Lawrence Summers is the current director of the National Economic Council, acting as economic advisor to President Barack Obama. Summers also holds a position as a tenured professor at Harvard University, where he served as the university's president from 2001 to 2006. He was the undersecretary, and then the Secretary of the Treasury under the Clinton's administration, and also worked for a year as an economist for Reagan's administration from 1982-83. He holds degrees in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University.