Contest Winners
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Creative Writing Contest Winners, 2017

The William Carlos Williams Prize
from the Academy of American Poets

Awarded to the best original poetry by a graduate student.

Winner: Julia Kolchinsky Dasbach

Contest judge Muriel Leung writes of Julia Kolchinsky Dasbach's "Letters to My Son, November 8th, 2016": "Remember, when half of your ancestors died, the other half / did the killing,” Dasbach writes in her poem, which reminds a child to be vigilant towards a history that traverses years of violence done to a people and to consider what it means to also be complicit in that violence. This is the burden of inheritance, but for the poet, it also becomes a form of resistance. Each word in this collection is stone, is a way to grieve, to remember, a way to say that beyond the memorial is the lived life, the life that a people must keep on living.

Second Place: Davy Knittle

Contest judge Muriel Leung writes: I’m delighted by the poems in this collection, which reveal so much through their humor as the lines wind across the page, throw us for a loop, and settle us back in again only to be uprooted once more. As clever as these poems are, they never deride the heart behind the speakers’ longing, whether for another or for a better self. This is a poet who understands the intimacy of a couplet, the slipperiness of desire within it and all that it can reveal within such a small space.


The College Alumni Society Poetry Prize
Awarded to the best original poetry by an undergraduate student.

Winner: Carlos Price-Sanchez

Contest judge Muriel Leung writes: In poems like “[THE NEW ECONOMY],” a masterful poet bridges pop modernity, city life, and nature in this “nation-bag / full of teeth.” These poems are stocked with cultural knowledge that links family rituals to global identity politics, and in each turn, is so keenly aware not only of the geography of land, but also the geography of language and the page. These are stunning poems spun by truly adept hands, never didactic, and highly original—I cannot wait to see more from this poet in the future.

Second Place: Peter LaBerge

Contest judge Muriel Leung writes: Poems in this collection achieve great magnitude and weight through their capacity for examining the quiet resonances of one’s life. I’m so thoroughly moved by these works, which take us from a small town in Ohio to the heart of a young queer boy whose desire for lightning belongs to a hope for a world in which nature can be itself in all its unbridled glory. These poems know so much intimacy, such contemplative empathy, that they are in so many ways, the urgent poems we need right now.

Third Place: Connie Yu

Contest judge Muriel Leung writes: In these slotted prose poems that forgo punctuation in favor of the extended thought rendered through gaps and spaces, this poet plays with moments of rupture in memory, be it through language, one’s sexual identity, one’s preoccupation with war, or of contesting model minority myth-making. This poet sets the stakes high for theorizing the language in relation to body to identity. The logic of these poems do not flounder; rather, they keep us rapt in attention at each turn, completely mesmerized by their density, their argument, and their sway.

About the judge: Muriel Leung is the author of Bone Confetti (Noemi Press, 2016). Her poetry, fiction, and nonfiction can be found or is forthcoming in Drunken Boat, The Collagist, Fairy Tale Review, Ghost Proposal, Jellyfish Magazine, inter/rupture, and elsewhere. She is a recipient of a Kundiman fellowship and is a regular contributor to the Blood-Jet Writing Hour poetry podcast. She is also a poetry coeditor of Apogee Journal. Currently, she is pursuing her PhD in creative writing and literature at the University of Southern California.


The Phi Kappa Sigma Fiction Prize
Awarded to the best original short story by an undergraduate student.

Winner: "End of the World" by Jeffrey Yang

Contest judge Sara Veglahn writes: I was hooked by the quiet understatement of the first few sentences of this strange and stunning story, and as a result, I completely trusted where I was being taken. Within this brief meditation on what it means to carve out a “pocket of existence” for oneself, there is the revelation that for some, it is the limits that offer solace, and for others it is the limitless. The ambiguity and multiplicity suggested by the ending is remarkable. This is a work of compressed emotion, of useful restraint, of how specificity and precision can offer an astonishing openness. I keep thinking about it.

Second Place: "2 for 1" by Gloria Yuen

Contest judge Sara Veglahn writes: Gloria Yuen’s “2 for 1” is a beautifully rendered narrative on family, identity, and what home means. It brings up the questions: What connects us? What divides us? And what happens when the ones to whom we should have the closest connection are the ones who seem to be the furthest away? Through subtle and elegant description, Yuen offers, in only a few pages, not only an examination of sibling rivalry, but also a revelation of the world outside ourselves and our place in it. Sophisticated, elegant, and profound.

Third Place: “An Incomplete List of Well-Intentioned Lies” by Julia Bell

Contest judge Sara Veglahn writes: I admire the edge that Julia Bell walks between humor and seriousness in her story “An Incomplete List of Well-Intentioned Lies.” The reader is placed in an almost fairytale-like realm, with uncles named Midas, a questionable swamp, a proliferation of snakes. Using the form of the vignette, the space that falls between the brief narratives becomes luminous with the unsaid. Calling to mind the novels of Marie Redonnet, Bell’s work offers a succinct account of a young woman held between knowing and unknowing, where the truth is always hovering below the surface.

Honorable Mentions

“walking” by Hannah Judd
“The House on Para Street” by Pritha Bhattacharyya
“Foreign Films” by Cameron Dichter

About the judge: Sara Veglahn’s novel The Ladies won the 2016 Noemi Press Book Award for Fiction and will be published in October 2017. Her novel The Mayflies was published by Dzanc Books in 2014. Her writing and reviews have appeared or are forthcoming in Full Stop, Caketrain, Poor Claudia, Conjunctions, Octopus, Fence, Tarpaulin Sky, and elsewhere. She holds an MFA in writing from the University of Massachusetts–Amherst and a PhD in literature and writing from the University of Denver, and lives and works in Denver.


The Judy Lee Award for Dramatic Writing
Awarded to a graduate or undergraduate student for the best script (stage, screen, television, or radio).

Winner: “Don’t Take Me Out” by Amanda Prager

Contest judge Madeleine George writes: This vivid, strange, delightful stoner comedy takes us into the underworld of crusty glamour shimmering behind the facade of an American college campus. This screenwriter has a sharp ear for language and the way young people use it, and her characters are compellingly real. The sly details she includes charm and delight—a whole world is contained in a drumstick stuck into a fire alarm—and she manages to mule in neo-transcendentalism and a Foucauldian critique of the surveillance state without rippling the surface of her well-constructed world. With the languid tempo of a Whit Stillman film, the chill specificity of The Big Lebowski, and the sweet satisfaction of an old-fashioned romantic comedy, this script feels like it’s forging a new genre even as it nods to its ancestors.

Second Place: “Birds of a Feather” by Liv Leigh Matlin

Contest judge Madeleine George writes: A sharp existentialist fable, “Birds of a Feather” is by turns frightening, surprising, and hilarious. This playwright understands what human bodies can do and be used for on stage—the visual language of gesture and stance is a particularly strong component of this script, even as the clever language games in the dialogue dazzle and disarm. There’s something genuinely scary about the blend of the banal, the scatalogical, and the corporate that this short but powerful play is exploring.

Third Place: “The Virtue of the Harvest” by Adam Ginsberg

Contest judge Madeleine George writes: This screenplay is a genre-bending, laugh-out-loud-funny quasi-historical satire slash political parable about ice harvesting in the 1850s—sort of! How the piece manages to feel both deeply researched and one hundred percent made up isn’t immediately obvious, but the writing throughout is confident, suspenseful, visually acute, quick-witted, and rhythmic. This writer has a devilishly smart way with words, and he’s a gripping storyteller, too.

Honorable Mentions:

“Man Up” by Jacob Barnes
“Beyond the Track” by Quan Lam and Seung-Hyun Chung
“Mad People” by Sarah Cho

About the judge: Madeleine George’s plays include The (curious case of the) Watson Intelligence (Pulitzer Prize finalist; Outer Critics Circle John Gassner Award), Seven Homeless Mammoths Wander New England (Susan Smith Blackburn finalist), Precious Little, and The Zero Hour (Jane Chambers Award, Lambda Literary Award finalist). She’s a founding member of the Obie Award–winning playwrights’ collective 13P (Thirteen Playwrights Inc.), the Mellon Playwright in Residence at Two River Theater in New Jersey, and a Fellow for Curriculum and Program Development at the Bard Prison Initiative at Bard College.


The Lilian and Benjamin Levy Award
Awarded to the best review by an undergraduate student of a current play, film, music release, book, or performance.

Winner: Nikhil Venkatesa, review of American Honey

Contest judge Ashley Kahn writes: The same nonstop, visual energy and breathless exuberance one would expect from a film that follows a ragtag group of post-adolescent, not-quite-adults journeying through America is captured in lines like: “[Director] Andrea Arnold is obsessed with animals: dogs, bees, birds, horses, cows, fireflies, a grasshopper, even a bear…” and “strip clubs, bars, county fairs, grocery outlets, and dollar stores…” There are insights as well that speak of the movie’s message, critiquing “a middle America fraught with poverty and hypocrisy…wealthy neighborhoods composed of designer homes and lush backyards…in stark contrast to the dingy motel rooms where the crew shacks up each night.” The review includes an understanding of Arnold’s other films, and how American Honey compares to similar coming-of-age tales that mix music and a flavors of cinema verité to portray the heartless American heartland.

Second Place: Angela Huang, review of Solange, A Seat at the Table

Contest judge Ashley Kahn writes: With an informed balance of Solange’s personal and musical history, and a deep understanding of her current creative efforts, this review explains a breakthrough recording to even a first-time fan’s satisfaction. It covers the primary points about what is clearly the artist’s most mature recording to date—its political and humanistic stance, its personal revelations and discoveries. At times, the language of the review itself becomes musical, as when the focus turns to a moment on the tune “Rise,” “a perfect prequel to an album all about falling, falling, falling—but soldiering on.” Or a line that is both lyrical and enticing: “the album is dipped in honey; it is remedial R&B that goes down smooth like syrup.” With those few words, one can enjoy both the description as well as the music being described.

Third Place: Stephan Cho, Review of Moonlight and La La Land

Contest judge Ashley Kahn writes: An intriguing and ambitious think piece on why two films that have captivated critical and public acclaim might have both proven more successful had their respective directors traded genres—the musical (La La Land) being a drama, while Moonlight would have benefitted more with song and dance numbers. It’s a novel idea, and with insight and a sense of history and fun, Cho develops his argument, pointing out the scenes and players who could have made those changes happen effectively.

Honorable Mentions

Peter LaBerge, review of Ocean Vuong’s Night Sky With Exit Wounds
Ritwik Bhatia, review of Frank Ocean’s Endless
James Sheplock, review of King Cobra

About the judge: Ashley Kahn is a Grammy-winning American music historian, journalist, producer, and educator. He teaches at New York University’s Clive Davis Institute for Recorded Music; in 2014, Kahn coauthored the autobiography of Carlos Santana, titled The Universal Tone: Bringing My Story to Light, and he is acclaimed for his books on two legendary recordings: Kind of Blue by Miles Davis and A Love Supreme by John Coltrane. Kahn has held a variety of positions in the music business, as radio deejay, video producer, concert producer, road manager, and TV music editor, and is currently an adjunct professor at New York University, teaching various courses for the Clive Davis Department of Recorded Music in NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts. His writing has garnered three ASCAP/Deems Taylor awards and three Grammy nominations, and in 2015, he was awarded a Grammy for his album notes to the John Coltrane release Offering: Live at Temple University.


The Ezra Pound Prize for Literary Translation
Awarded to the best English-language translation of verse or prose from any language by a graduate or undergraduate student

Winner (tie):

Michaela Kotziers, translation of an excerpt from Parzival by Wolfram von Eschenbach (Middle High German)


Contest judge Fiona Sze-Lorrain writes: “The day you shot your first bird dead, / the sound of its song grew. / It started out a whistle, whispering through / leaves caught by your arrow’s test, / but then it rose into your breast / and ripped a hole between / what you had understood to mean / our world removed from history / and you, or where you should be.” This is an impressive rendering of a passage from German medieval poet and knight Wolfram von Eschenbach’s epic poem whose timelessness and lyrical intensity is felt via Michaela Kotziers’ conscientious use of rhymes, and her distinct yet modern sense of a narrative arc in traditional as well as free verse.

Ariel Resnikoff, translation of four excerpts from “The House” by Avoth Yeshurun (Hebrew)

Contest judge Fiona Sze-Lorrain writes: Ariel Resnikoff’s translation of Israeli poet Avoth Yeshurun is dense, concise, diligent, well-researched, and surprisingly idiosyncratic. (As evoked in the first excerpt “the floor”: “now // one heap / resembles one. / each one, / technical & spiritual.”) It seeks to introduce, without didacticism, a much-appreciated bi/multi-cultural sensitivity and philosophical depth to Yeshurun’s sophisticated poetic vision, imaginings, and music.

Second Place (tie):

Cristina Serban, translation of an excerpt from “This Is My Name” by Adonis (Arabic)


Contest judge Fiona Sze-Lorrain writes: Cristina Serban’s translation is at once compelling and revealing in its stark simplicity and elegant musicality. Says the poetic hero(ine): “I will call this city a cadaver / And I will call Syria’s trees grieving birds / (Perhaps a flower or a song / Will be born of this name).” Be it political or personal, the voice in this version of Adonis sings: it is self-restrained, vulnerable, and moving.

Devorah Fischler, translation of a chapter excerpt from The Animal by Rachilde (French)

Contest judge Fiona Sze-Lorrain writes: “The young woman, her feet curled around the ladder’s rung, head in the wind, leaned on her elbows, as if she were on a balcony. She did not see anything extraordinary, just a cat running away toward the nearest chimney.” The nineteenth-century French woman writer Rachilde deserves more contemporary readership in the English-language world. Devorah Fischler’s close, consistent reading of an excerpt from Rachilde’s novel The Animal is both an admirable work of interpretation and literary taste.

Third Place: Yehudith Dashevsky, translation of excerpts from “Requiem” by Anna Akhmatova (Russian)

Contest judge Fiona Sze-Lorrain writes: Yehudith Dashevsky honors Anna Akhmatova with a sincere study of her acclaimed elegy “Requiem”—”For them, I have woven a shroud out of words, / Out of their poor words, which I overheard. // Them—I remember, all the time, in every place, / New woes cannot drive them from memory’s space.” The emotional range in these poems and translations is arresting. Dashevsky’s translation is an experience that moves between the unsayables for both languages, resurrecting both the memory and the tragic.

Honorable Mention

Omar Khoury, translation of Mahmoud Darwish’s “Rita and the Rifle” (Arabic)

About the judge:
Fiona Sze-Lorrain is a poet, literary translator, and zheng harpist who writes and translates in English, French, and Chinese. Her third poetry collection, The Ruined Elegance, out from Princeton, is a finalist for the 2016 Los Angeles Times Book Prize and chosen by Library Journal as one of the ”Best Books 2015: Poetry.” Her latest translation, contemporary Chinese poet-scenographer Yi Lu’s Sea Summit (Milkweed, 2016), is shortlisted for the Best Translated Book Award. Also the author of two previous titles, My Funeral Gondola (2013) and Water the Moon (2010), and several translations of contemporary Chinese, Taiwanese, and American poets, she lives in Paris.


The Gibson Peacock Prize for Creative Nonfiction
Awarded to the best creative nonfiction piece by an undergraduate student.

Winner: “Dark House” by Peter LaBerge

Contest judge Colin Dickey writes: A haunting excavation of memory and identity—from its opening, poetic line, “Dark House” hooks the reader and doesn’t let go. The cascading vignettes through the years create a powerful sense of both dislocation and familiarity, all of which really helps capture the landscape and the personalities of this tiny town. This piece also taps into the hidden menace of the American small town: a sense of foreboding and unease is always lurking just beneath the veneer of suburban peace. Above all the writing, which is by turns spare and eloquent, carries the reader through this unsettling but beautiful dreamscape.

Second Place: “Notes on the Afterlives” by Keyla Cavdar

Contest judge Colin Dickey writes: The writing here really took my breath away: a beautiful elegy that moves back and forth through time and place. The writer does a stunning job of incorporating Turkish into the narrative, and maintaining a poetic sensibility in both languages. As a meditation on what it means to belong to a country, it could not be more timely, but this piece’s real strength is in the way it uses evocative writing to create a kaleidoscope of identity and self all in the same narrator.

Third Place: “On Ivy-League Dumpster Diving” by Sharon Christner

Contest judge Colin Dickey writes: This piece offers a fascinating and poignant glimpse into the writer’s double life. Frank and plainspoken, it nonetheless creates empathy for a figure who’s not only on the margins of her Ivy League culture, but also, as we learn in the final paragraphs, on the margins of the dumpster diving culture as well. Stuck between two extremes, the writer’s depiction of alienation and fleeting kinship stays with you long after you finish reading.

About the judge: Colin Dickey is the author, most recently, of Ghostland: An American History in Haunted Places (Viking), as well as Cranioklepty: Grave Robbing and the Search for Genius and Afterlives of the Saints: Stories from the Ends of Faith. His work has appeared in The Believer, Lapham’s Quarterly, VICE, The Atlantic, Slate, and elsewhere. He is also the coeditor of The Morbid Anatomy Anthology. He currently teaches creative writing at National University.


The Parker Prize for Journalistic Writing
Awarded to the best newspaper or magazine article, feature story, exposé or other piece of investigative journalism (published or unpublished) by an undergraduate student.

Winner: “Untitled” by Rebecca Tan

Contest judge Tasneem Raja writes: Rebecca’s story presents a young person in crisis without flattening them into just that. We get to understand the big picture of her challenges through the small moments that make up her day-to-day. That’s hard to pull off without resorting to cinematic cliche, and I appreciate how Rebecca structured and told this story to lead us there.

Second Place: “Stateless Children in Hong Kong” by Casey Quackenbush

Contest judge Tasneem Raja writes: Casey’s story unpeels the many pressurized layers keeping this mother up at night, showing how bureaucracy and xenophobia and immigration policy are wreaking havoc on the most defenseless and blameless.

Third Place: “Bubble” by Caroline Harris

Contest judge Tasneem Raja writes: It’s hard to get people to sympathize with the affluent and the elite. This story challenges the reader to understand the ways in which well-off Silicon Valley teens in high-achieving households are just kids, after all, and unready for the enormous pressures that came with their station in life.

About the judge: Tasneem Raja writes for national magazines and journals, with a focus on culture and technology. A former senior editor at NPR, she launched a popular podcast exploring issues of identity and race with NPR’s Code Switch team. At Mother Jones, she specialized in data visualization and was part of a team that compiled the first-ever database of mass shootings in America. She’s a pioneer in the field of data-driven digital storytelling, a frequent speaker on issues of inclusion and diversity in the workplace, and a die-hard fan of alt weeklies, where she got her start as a local reporter. She lives in small-town East Texas with her husband and stepson.

The Creative Writing Honors Thesis Prize
Awarded to the most outstanding honors thesis.

Winners:

Hannah Judd, for "Teeth/Not," advised by Max Apple
Pallavi Wakharkar, for "Holdings," advised by Beth Kephart
Connie Yu, for "open address," advised by Julia Bloch

About the award: Our judges have decided that each of these three projects articulates such a distinct sense of craft, form, method, and linguistic vitality that they will share this year's thesis prize. Each is a writing project that exceeds the boundaries of the undergraduate honors thesis program, that struck the panel as coherent and complete in its execution, and that shows maturity of vision and command of craft. Congratulations, Hannah, Pallavi, and Connie!

Creative Writing Contest Winners, 2016

The William Carlos Williams Prize
from the Academy of American Poets

Awarded to the best original poetry by a graduate student.

Winner: Julia Kolchinsky Dasbach

Contest judge Jane Wong writes of the winning submission: “Out of Stone” is a beautiful and terrifying poem which builds a forgotten history, stone by stone. Stone as in strength, stone as in weight, stone as in foundation. The poem opens with a striking sensory moment: “the smell of eggs and herring.” Memory floods back with intense synesthesia. This poem reflects on the speaker’s visit to Treblinka Memorial Park in Poland. The collective trauma of the Holocaust moves into the personal — an overwhelming legacy for the speaker: “so much / stone, I considered bringing a small one back / to my great-grandmother’s grave. but she’d had/enough already.” There are so many moments of sonic beauty here, where words tumble about in the mouth: “cobble to asphalt to uneven / love and unleavened/bread.” I keep returning to this poem again and again, struck by its unanswered, haunting questions: “who would endure / how long it takes / to get to loving them? / and who loves / a stone?”

The College Alumni Society Poetry Prize
Awarded to the best original poetry by an undergraduate student.

Winner: Peter LaBerge

Contest judge Jane Wong writes of Peter LaBerge’s “Gust”: This poem is uncanny — shining a bright light on that which is hidden. Throughout, the imagery is uneasy and precise: “It begins with thousands / of curious boys, and ends with snow / the color of a fingertip.” The poem begins and begins again, repeating each story of violence anew: “It begins a game and ends / a pistol in the ground. It begins / with metaphor, and ends with a boy running naked / and bloody through the forest / of his own skin.” Moreover, its prose form with interior line breaks create a suffocating experience for the reader. By the end, we know something has occurred and is about to occur again: “It begins with hello, and ends / with the receiver nearly touching / the floor.” The word “nearly touching” is so devastating here.

Second place: Nina Lu

Contest judge Jane Wong writes of Nina Lu’s “Mother told us she wanted goldfish”: I was immediately struck by this poem’s visceral imagery. The poem is surreal and grotesque, featuring smallmouth bass in a fish tank in the piano room. This poem is a wildly imaginative amalgamation of Elizabeth Bishop’s “The Fish” and Li-Young Lee’s “The Cleaving.” The poem is full of vibrant imagery: “So we poured their slippery, shiny bodies into the kitchen sink / And beat them quick against the head with / The blunt edge of a butcher’s knife.” This poem reminds us of what we can’t bear to look at.

Third place: Carlos Price-Sanchez

Contest judge Jane Wong writes of Carlos Price-Sanchez’s “mantras: immigrantes”: Language turns and turns again in this beautiful poem, with “mantras” echoing Gloria Anzaldúa’s linguistic border crossing. I find myself returning to this poem’s surreal language, which reminds us of stubborn myths and the stakes of migration — particularly when thinking about the American Dream: “soaked habichuelas are bobbing tear-moons,” “ i should ride it straight into Havana like a swimming pig,” and the incredible last line, “panthers leaping over doubling water.”

About the judge: Jane Wong’s poems can be found in places such as Best American Poetry 2015, Best New Poets 2012, Hayden’s Ferry Review, Third Coast, The Volta, and others. A Kundiman fellow, she is the recipient of scholarships and fellowships from the U.S. Fulbright Program, the Fine Arts Work Center, Squaw Valley, and the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference. She teaches at the University of Washington Bothell and the Hugo House. She is the author of Overpour (Action Books), forthcoming this fall.

The Phi Kappa Sigma Fiction Prize
Awarded to the best original short story by an undergraduate student

Winner: “Slumber Party” by Casey Lynch

Contest judge Selah Saterstrom writes: “Slumber Party” by Casey Lynch offers an unflinching, keening language — punctuated by excellent narrative timing — through which to consider the complexity and mystery of identity when sieved through its relations to others. Here is a story in which there is no cheap resolution. Rather, readers are granted an experience that is far more radiant and accurate: a deep sense of the ways we are both lost and found through the act of loving and/or attempting to. Lynch’s sense of detail does a marvelous job of expressing the emotional gravity of the situation. Indeed: here is an emerging writer who has a rich, nuanced, darkly humorous and wise voice, one I hope to read for many years to come.

Second place: “Roleplay” by Cameron Dichter

Contest judge Selah Saterstrom writes: The narrative through-line in “Roleplay” strikes me as rather genius. In addition to being very funny prose, make no mistake: there is also a deeper story here, one about transmutation, identity, and what intimacy might mean. “Roleplay” reminds that comedy orbits a dark sun, and attempts at intimacy — as awkward and wonderful as they might be — are not for the faint of heart. Here is prose writing that is remarkably efficient, but never at the expense of the gloriously placed detail. I keep returning to “Roleplay” to read it again — and perhaps this says more than my attempts to articulate how stunning this brief story is.

Third Place: “How to Kiss a Girl” by Nicolas J. Betancourt

Contest judge Selah Saterstrom writes: “How to Kiss a Girl” by Nicolas J. Betancourt maintains a sort of quiet elegance, which is to say: power. In remarkably little page space, Betancourt’s prose renders vulnerability with such nuance it feels almost tangible (no easy thing to do in writing!). Additionally, Betancourt’s use of the second-person narrative is well balanced and effective (and on that note, I was reminded of Jim Grimsley’s gorgeous book using the second-person narrative, Winter Birds). How to Kiss a Girl is an abbreviated Bildungsroman, one that reminds readers of the beauty of not (yet) knowing everything.

Honorable mentions:

“Taxi” by Emily Hoeven
“Three or Four or Six” by Zoe Stoller
“Fathers of Revolution” by Kimberly Lu
“Death and Other Inconveniences” by Miranda van Dijk
“Letter to a Stranger” by Brenda Wang

About the judge: Selah Saterstrom is the author of three novels, most recently Slab (Coffee House Press, 2015), which was also an award-winning play adapted for the stage by Square Product Theatre. She is the author of the forthcoming Ideal Suggestions: Essays in Divinatory Poetics (Essay Press, 2016), and curates Madam Harriette Presents, an occasional performance series. Her work has been widely anthologized and published, and she teaches and lectures across the United States. She is the director of creative writing at the University of Denver.

The Judy Lee Award for Dramatic Writing
Awarded to a graduate or undergraduate student for the best script (stage, screen, television, or radio)

Winner: “Sunset Stays” by Cameron Ditcher

Contest judge Casey Llewellyn writes: I was engaged from the beginning by the specificity of the images and the attention paid to storytelling through juxtaposition. I did not read the story; it unfolded around me. Characters were specific and complicated, and I really felt like I got to know them in the time I spent with them (because you showed me the right things). I could hold the wildness of the story’s trajectory because each moment was extremely well crafted. And it is lovely to feel like a movie really goes somewhere you could never have imagined and creates another world.

Second place: “Swipe” by Cami Potter

Contest judge Casey Llewellyn writes: This script really grew on me over the course of reading it, becoming increasingly more surprising, specific and original, and by the end I was laughing out loud and could not put it down. The plot construction is extremely skillful. The stage directions are used skillfully and hilariously to create the tone of the piece.

Third place: “The Virtual Present” by Naomi Bernstein and “For The Judy Lee Award for Dramatic Writing” by Ezekiel Mathur (tie)

Contest judge Casey Llewellyn writes: The subtle, emotional story and the sense of being quietly with Naomi’s characters in “The Virtual Present” will stay with me. I really appreciated the kindness of this story. I enjoyed the reading experience of “For The Judy Lee Award for Dramatic Writing” immensely. I found the voice and the theatrical implications exciting! Which is a rare joy. Naomi Bernstein and Ezekiel Mathur are both voices I want to hear more from!

About the judge: Casey Llewellyn is a writer and theater maker whose work interrogates identity, collectivity and form. Works for theatre include: O, Earth (commissioned and produced by the Foundry Theatre at HERE, January/February 2016), The Body Which Is the Town, Zaide!, Obsession Piece, The Quiet Way, Existing Conditions (cowritten with Claudia Rankine), and I Love Dick, an adaptation for theater of the book by Chris Kraus. Her essay “What We Could Do With Writing” appears in The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind edited by Claudia Rankine, Beth Loffreda, and Max King Cap.

The Lilian and Benjamin Levy Award
Awarded to the best review by an undergraduate student of a current play, film, music release, book, or performance

Winner: Clare Lombardo, review of the Royal Court Theatre production of Hangmen

Contest judge Ada Calhoun writes: This elegant review of the Martin McDonagh play Hangmen stands out for its wry, stylish writing. Lombardo is equally poised discussing the show’s aesthetics—the “umbrella-topped shadows across the windows”—and the social and political context of its death-penalty message. Better yet, the review is funny—as when Lombardo notes the “less-than-progressive” attitude of certain characters.

Second place: Peter LaBerge, review of Richie Hofmann’s Second Empire

Contest judge Ada Calhoun writes: “What do you do when you don’t fit tradition?” This is the question Peter LaBerge identifies as the guiding theme of Richie Hofmann’s debut poetry collection, Second Empire. With an effective use of quotes and a thoughtful interpretation of the poet’s reflections on shame and identity, LaBerge explores the book’s “emotional currents of insecurity and restraint” with both integrity and flair.

Third place: Ava Van der Meer, review of Jonathan Barrow’s On the Run with Mary

Contest judge Ada Calhoun writes: This enthusiastic review of Jonathan Barrow’s On the Run with Mary champions the book’s intoxicating “world of substance abuse, evil headmasters, bodily excrement, and sexual licentiousness.” Van der Meer matches the “witty energy” of the book with a clever, feisty style of her own.

Honorable mentions:

Amanda Silberling on Palehound’s Ellen Kempner
Mark Paraskevas on Indigold

About the judge: Ada Calhoun is author of the critically acclaimed new nonfiction book St. Marks Is Dead. She has been a freelance journalist for eighteen years, during which time she has written about culture for the New York Times, Billboard, and New York Magazine.

The Ezra Pound Prize for Literary Translation
Awarded to the best English-language translation of verse or prose from any language by a graduate or undergraduate student

Winner: Jordan Paul, translation of an excerpt from the novel Ephraim by Yoel Hoffman

Contest judge Marit MacArthur writes: This excerpt from the novel expresses the mundane details, existential disorientation and cultural and emotional weight of the vignettes in fresh, vivid language that does not call undue attention to itself and thus is beautiful. Every word choice is pitch-perfect, and the punctuation and syntax get across the narrative voice with idiosyncratic aptitude.

Second place: Lisa Cheung, translation of “La Niña Mala” by Monserrat Ordóñez Vilá

Contest judge Marit MacArthur writes: This is a very persuasive, idiomatic translation of the voice of the “good girl,” fantasizing about behaving as a bad girl—that is, like her father. Excellent management of deceptively simple, precise diction against syntactic surprises—a very skillful rendering indeed. This is publishable, nigh anthologizable. It would pair well with Jamaica Kincaid’s “Girl.”

Third place: Angela Dion, translation of “Accade di Vedere” and “Ancora Siano I Seigni” by Annamaria Ferramosca

Contest judge Marit MacArthur writes: These are obviously brilliant poems in the Italian and very compelling in English, very nearly publishable, with a consistent voice and careful management of metaphor and sound.

Honorable Mentions:

Megan Gross, translation of “Spleen” by Charles Baudelaire
Meg Pendoley, translation of “Quiet” by Valeri Petrov
Naomi Bernstein, translation of “Set Free” by Gabriela Mistral
Madeline Penn, translation of “One Word” by Gabriela Mistral

About the judge: Marit MacArthur has published translations from the Polish and reviews of translations in World Literature Today, Verse, American Poetry Review, Poetry International, The Yale Review, and Contemporary Poetry Review. With Kacper Bartczak she curated “(Polish) Poetry after Rozewicz,” representing eleven contemporary Polish poets, in Jacket2 in November 2015. In 2008 she was a Fulbright Research Fellow at the University of Lodz, Poland, where she worked on collaborative translation and the reciprocal influences of Polish and American modern and contemporary poetry.

The Gibson Peacock Prize for Creative Nonfiction
Awarded to the best creative nonfiction piece by an undergraduate student

Winner: “The Holy Boys” by Peter LaBerge

Contest judge Liz Arnold writes: I was very impressed with how this piece explored issues of identity in a well-structured narrative with humor, candor, and a poetic sensibility. LaBerge has a firm grasp on his material, which allowed the narrator in this piece to reflect on his younger self—a sophisticated quality that I think is rare in young writers.

Second place: “Lake Street” by Meg Pendoley

Contest judge Liz Arnold writes: I was immediately drawn into this work because of Pendoley’s ease with language; she makes it look effortless, and her reflection on selling a house through the narrative of a missing cat gave the piece emotional depth (“the cat gets to stage his trauma for days longer than the rest of us”). It also had a very successful use of time, moving from past to present without a hitch. I was reminded of “Lost Cat” by Mary Gaitskill.

Third place: “Oranges for the War God” by Kimberly Lu

Contest judge Liz Arnold writes: I liked how this piece uses Chinese mythology to paint a portrait of the grandfather—it’s educational and gives the work historical and cultural significance. (I always loved what Nabokov said about great writers, that they should be storytellers, educators, and enchanters. A lot of nonfiction lacks the education component, I think.) The trope of oranges is repeated several times, which keeps the piece feeling tightly focused and poetic as it moves through time and place.

About the judge: Liz Arnold’s prose has appeared or is forthcoming in the Los Angeles Review of Books, Ninth Letter, The New York Times, and online at The Paris Review and Catapult, among others. Her essays have placed in contests held by The Atlantic and Georgetown Review. Homebodies, her blog of photography and writing about the un-styled homes of people she visits, was profiled in The New York Times and elsewhere, and she now writes a column of the same name for Nylon magazine. Liz is a teaching artist in New York City public schools with Teachers & Writers Collaborative, and the Wall Street Journal recently wrote about her innovative teaching style. She holds an MFA in nonfiction from the Bennington Writing Seminars.

The Parker Prize for Journalistic Writing
Awarded to the best newspaper or magazine article, feature story, exposé or other piece of investigative journalism (published or unpublished) by an undergraduate student

Winner: “Maintenance Mayhem” by Dan Spinelli

Contest judge Molly Eichel writes: Incredibly well reported piece on maintenance issues at Penn. It’s not a sexy issue, but the writer really looks at every angle of this issue and how it affects the students who live on campus.

Second place: “The Dividing Line” by Jill Castellano and Casey Quackenbush

Contest judge Molly Eichel writes: Nicely reported piece on cocaine use at Penn. While I’m normally not a fan of so many anonymous sources, they were able to make these pseudonyms seems like real characters.

Third place: “2 Street” by Sarah Wilson

Contest judge Molly Eichel writes: Lovely piece of narrative journalism. Great characters.

About the judge: Molly Eichel is an assistant features editor at the Philadelphia Inquirer, where she writes and edits the television and weekend sections. She is also a contributor to the AV Club and Backstage magazine. Molly grew up in Philadelphia, where she spent a good deal of her time sitting too close to the television set.



Creative Writing Contest Winners 2015



The William Carlos Williams Prize,
from The Academy of American Poets

awarded for the best original poems by a graduate student
Judge: Laure-Anne Bosselaar

Winner: Julia Kolchinsky Dasbach

The College Alumni Society Poetry Prizes
awarded to the best original poems by an undergraduate
Judge: Laure-Anne Bosselaar

First: Glenn Tanner Shrum

Second: Miguel Aldaco

Third: Eric J. Xu

Honorable Mention: Annika Neklason, Kea Edwards
                

The Phi Kappa Sigma Fiction Prizes
awarded for the best original fiction by an undergraduate
Judge: Daniel Torday

First: Alina Grabowski

Second: Meg Pendoley

Third: Peter LaBerge


Honorable Mentions: Maya Afilalo, Donals Antenen, Ailin Cao, Chole Sabbs


The Judy Lee Award for Dramatic Writing
awarded to a graduate or undergraduate for the best script
(for stage, screen, television, or radio)
Judge: Camille Stochitch

First: Jonanthan Osinaike

Second: Isabelle Mecattaf

Third: Michelle Ma


The Lilian and Benjamin Levy Award
awarded for the best review by an undergraduate
of a current play, book, film, cd, art show, or performance
Judge: Elizabeth Mosier

First: Barbara Nolan

Second: Amanda Silberling

Third: Annika Neklason


The Ezra Pound Prize for Literary Translation
awarded for the best translation from any language of
either verse or prose by a graduate or undergraduate
Judge: Adria Bernardi

First: Julia Kolchinsky Dasbach

Second: Sarah Pierce Taylor

Third: J. B. Maney

Honorable Mentions: Meg Pendoley, Maya Vinokour


The Gibson Peacock Prize for Creative Nonfiction

awarded for the best nonfiction piece by an undergraduate
Judge: Chanan Tigay

First: Gabrielle Skladman

Second: Sarah Greene

Third: Aviva Rosen

Honorable Mentions: Diksha Bali, Katherine Blum, Melissa Co, Kea Edwards, Nadia Laher, Ben Lerner, Blake London

The Parker Prize
awarded to the best newspaper or magazine article, feature story, exposé
or other piece of investigative journalism by an undergraduate
Judge: Jeff Gammage

Winner: Katherine Blum



Creative Writing Contest Winners 2014



The William Carlos Williams Prize,
from The Academy of American Poets

awarded for the best original poems by a graduate student
Judge: Michael Waters

Winner: Julia Kolchinsky Dasbach

The College Alumni Society Poetry Prizes
awarded to the best original poems by an undergraduate
Judge: Michael Waters

First: Lyn Li Che

Second: Seth Simons

Third: Peter LaBerge

Honorable Mention: Lina Hashem, Divya Ramesh, Eric Xu
                

The Phi Kappa Sigma Fiction Prizes
awarded for the best original fiction by an undergraduate
Judge: Justin Taylor

First: Alina Grabowski

Second: Erin Peraza

Third: Meg Pendoley


The Judy Lee Award for Dramatic Writing
awarded to a graduate or undergraduate for the best script
(for stage, screen, television, or radio)
Judge: Asaph Polonsky

First: Aaron Klapwald

Second: Elvina Yau

Third: Seth Simons


The Lilian and Benjamin Levy Award
awarded for the best review by an undergraduate
of a current play, book, film, cd, art show, or performance
Judge: Eric Banks

First: Shaj Mathew

Second: David Spelman

Third: Kenna O'Rourke


The Ezra Pound Prize for Literary Translation
awarded for the best translation from any language of
either verse or prose by a graduate or undergraduate
Judge: Mihaela Moscaliuc

First: Devorah Fischler

Second: Peter I. Osorio

Third: Lauren Kaufmann

Honorable Mentions: Bill Beck, Nathaniel Davis, Alex Judd


The Gibson Peacock Prize for Creative Nonfiction

awarded for the best nonfiction piece by an undergraduate
Judge: Jane Satterfield

First: Nicole Greenstein

Second: Nadia Laher

Third: Peter LaBerge

Honorable Mentions: Maegan A. Cadet, David Marchino

The Parker Prize
awarded to the best newspaper or magazine article, feature story, exposé
or other piece of investigative journalism by an undergraduate
Judge: Jennifer Lin

Winner: Sam Brodey



Creative Writing Contest Winners 2013



The William Carlos Williams Prize,
from The Academy of American Poets

awarded for the best original poems by a graduate student
Judge: Lia Purpura

Winner: Amy Conwell

The College Alumni Society Poetry Prizes
awarded to the best original poems by an undergraduate
Judge: Lia Purpura

First: Seth Simons

Second: Linda Wang

Third: Lisa Pang

Honorable Mention: Madeleine Kruhly, Glenn Shrum, Eric Xu
                

The Phi Kappa Sigma Fiction Prizes
awarded for the best original fiction by an undergraduate
Judge: Eileen Pollack

First: Taylor Cook

Second: Alina Grabowski

Third: Callie Ward

Honorable Mention: Alica Ma, Richard Thomson
The Judy Lee Award for Dramatic Writing
awarded to a graduate or undergraduate for the best script
(for stage, screen, television, or radio)
Judge: Rob Cohen

First: Emily Sheera Cutler

Second: Aaron Klapwald

Third: Sam Pasternack

Honorable Mention: Daniel Eisenberg

The Lilian and Benjamin Levy Award
awarded for the best review by an undergraduate
of a current play, book, film, cd, art show, or performance
Judge: Melanie Rehak

First: Kiley Bense

Second: Alexa Bryn

Third: Shaj Mathew

The Ezra Pound Prize for Literary Translation
awarded for the best translation from any language of
either verse or prose by a graduate or undergraduate
Judge: Adam Sorkin

First: Carolyn Brunelle

Second: Anjali Tsui

Third: Jacqueline Yue


The Gibson Peacock Prize for Creative Nonfiction

awarded for the best nonfiction piece by an undergraduate
Judge: Chris Kemp

First: Eric Kim

Second: Michael Morse

Third: Elizabeth Horkley

Honorable Mention: Barbara Nolan, Matt Chylak, Katie Giarla, Jesse DuBois, Eesha Sardesai

The Parker Prize
awarded to the best newspaper or magazine article, feature story, exposé
or other piece of investigative journalism by an undergraduate
Judge: Avery Rome

Winner: Joe Pinsker



Creative Writing Contest Winners 2012



The William Carlos Williams Prize,
from The Academy of American Poets

awarded for the best original poems by a graduate student
Judge: Daisy Fried

Winner: Lauren Hall

The College Alumni Society Poetry Prizes
awarded to the best original poems by an undergraduate
Judge: Daisy Fried

First: David Carpenter

Second: John Valadez

Third: Ashlee Paxton-Turner

Honorable Mention: Shoshana Akabas, Kiri Nakamura,
                

The Phi Kappa Sigma Fiction Prizes
awarded for the best original fiction by an undergraduate
Judge: Alicia Oltuski

First: Leah Steinberg

Second: Daniel Felsenthal

Third: Michael King

Honorable Mention: Taylor Cook, Rebecca LeVine, Alice Yiwei Ma, Ashlee-Paxton-Turner

The Judy Lee Award for Dramatic Writing
awarded to a graduate or undergraduate for the best script
(for stage, screen, television, or radio)
Judge: Mary Ann Braubach

First: Laura Bowes

Second: Brittney Jones-Ali

Third: Matthew Federici


The Lilian and Benjamin Levy Award
awarded for the best review by an undergraduate
of a current play, book, film, cd, art show, or performance
Judge: Christian Hoard

First: Shaj Mathew

Second: Alexa Bryn

Third: Elizabeth Horkley

The Ezra Pound Prize for Literary Translation
awarded for the best translation from any language of
either verse or prose by a graduate or undergraduate
Judge: Wayne Miller

First: Jonathan Maney

Second: Jacqueline Yue

Third: William Beck


The Gibson Peacock Prize for Creative Nonfiction

awarded for the best nonfiction piece by an undergraduate
Judge: Gideon Lewis-Kraus

First: Alison Berman

Second: Michael Morse

Third: Ellie Levitt

The Parker Prize
awarded to the best newspaper or magazine article, feature story, exposé
or other piece of investigative journalism by an undergraduate
Judge: Craig McCoy

Winner: Ellie Levitt

Honorable Mention: Jessica Goodman



Creative Writing Contest Winners 2011



The William Carlos Williams Prize,
from The Academy of American Poets

awarded for the best original poems by a graduate student
Judge: Philip Dacey

Winner: Matthew Federici

The College Alumni Society Poetry Prizes
awarded to the best original poems by an undergraduate
Judge: Philip Dacey

First: Justin Ching

Second: Arabella Susie Ahn

Third: Jenny Fan

Honorable Mention: Alexander Athienitis, Ken Chang, Lyn Li Che, Matthew Chiarello,
                                 Emily Fisher, Lisa Pang, Trishula Patel, Ashlee Paxton-Turner

The Phi Kappa Sigma Fiction Prizes
awarded for the best original fiction by an undergraduate
Judge: Richard Burgin

First: Daniel Felsenthal

Second: Anne Huang

Third: Lyn Li Che

Honorable Mention: Esther Saks, Joe Pinsker

The Judy Lee Award for Dramatic Writing
awarded to a graduate or undergraduate for the best script
(for stage, screen, television, or radio)
Judge: Alex Bilger

First: Ying (Sarah) Zhang

Second: Ben Rosen

Third: Anna Belc


The Lilian and Benjamin Levy Award
awarded for the best review by an undergraduate
of a current play, book, film, cd, art show, or performance
Judge: Stephanie Zacharek

First: Colette Bloom

Second: Kiley Bense

Third: Aaron Klapwald

The Ezra Pound Prize for Literary Translation
awarded for the best translation from any language of
either verse or prose by a graduate or undergraduate
Judge: Chana Bloch

Winner: Jaqueline Yue


The Gibson Peacock Prize for Creative Nonfiction

awarded for the best nonfiction piece by an undergraduate
Judge: Jeff Sharlet

First: Jessica Goldstein

Second: Jenny Fan

Third: Justin Ching

The Parker Prize
awarded to the best newspaper or magazine article, feature story, exposé
or other piece of investigative journalism by an undergraduate
Judge: Catherine Lucey

Winner: Matt Flegenheimer




Creative Writing Contest Winners 2010



The William Carlos Williams Prize,
from The Academy of American Poets

awarded for the best original poems by a graduate student
Judge: Catie Rosemurgy

Winner: Cara Bertron

The College Alumni Society Poetry Prizes
awarded to the best original poems by an undergraduate
Judge: Catie Rosemurgy

First: Jessica Rivo

Second: Leo Amino

Third: Valeria Tsygankova

Honorable Mention: Lauren Yates, Frances Wright

The Phi Kappa Sigma Fiction Prizes
awarded for the best original fiction by an undergraduate
Judge: Jess Row

First:
Sanaë Lemoine

Second: Alyssa Songsiridej

Third: Anne Huang

Honorable Mention: Garret McKay, Zachary Sergi

The Judy Lee Award for Dramatic Writing
awarded to a graduate or undergraduate for the best script
(for stage, screen, television, or radio)
Judge: Dan Wigutow and Caroline Moore

First: Zachary Sergi

Second: Terrence Sellers

Third: Garret McKay


The Lilian and Benjamin Levy Award
awarded for the best review by an undergraduate
of a current play, book, film, cd, art show, or performance
Judge: Nathan Brackett

Winner: Aliza Hoffman

The Ezra Pound Prize for Literary Translation
awarded for the best translation from any language of
either verse or prose by a graduate or undergraduate
Judge: George Economou

Co-Winners: Christopher Schaefer
                     Valeria Tsygankova

The Gibson Peacock Prize for Creative Nonfiction

awarded for the best nonfiction piece by an undergraduate
Judge: J. C. Hallman

First: Matt Flegenheimer

Second: Molly Johnsen

Third: Sarah Richter

Honorable Mentions: Rachel Taube, Maxime McKenna, Aliza Hoffman



Creative Writing Contest Winners 2009



The William Carlos Williams Prize,
from The Academy of American Poets

awarded for the best original poems by a graduate student
Judge: Robert Wrigley

Winner: Amy Paeth

The College Alumni Society Poetry Prizes
awarded to the best original poems by an undergraduate
Judge: Robert Wrigley

First:
Stephen Krewson

Second: Frances Wright

Third: Curtis Rogers

Honorable Mention: Lauren Yates

The Phi Kappa Sigma Fiction Prizes
awarded for the best original fiction by an undergraduate
Judge: Karen Russell

First: Sanaë Lemoine

Second: Ann Marie Meehan

Third: Yuri Castano

Honorable Mention: Rennie Whang

The Judy Lee Award for Dramatic Writing
awarded to a graduate or undergraduate for the best script
(for stage, screen, television, or radio)
Judge: Douglas Graham

First: David A. Chang

Second: Allison Karic

Third: Jean Elizabeth Lee


The Lilian and Benjamin Levy Award
awarded for the best review by an undergraduate
of a current play, book, film, cd, art show, or performance
Judge: Elysa Gardner

First: Douglas Moore

Second: Julie Steinberg

The Ezra Pound Prize for Literary Translation
awarded for the best translation from any language of
either verse or prose by a graduate or undergraduate
Judge: Lisa Sewell

Winner: Rachel Epstein


Creative Writing Program Prize in Nonfiction

awarded for the best nonfiction piece by an undergraduate
Judge: Dustin Smith

First: Sarah Cantin

Second: Penina Braffman

Third: Rebecca LeVine



Creative Writing Contest Winners 2008



The William Carlos Williams Prize,
from The Academy of American Poets

awarded for the best original poems by a graduate student
Judge: Stephe Dunn

Winner: Adrian Khactu

The College Alumni Society Poetry Prizes
awarded to the best original poems by an undergraduate
Judge: Stephen Dunn

First: Julie Steinberg

Second: Kara Daddario

Third: Valeria Tsygankova

Honorable Mention: Rivka Fogel

The Phi Kappa Sigma Fiction Prizes
awarded for the best original fiction by an undergraduate
Judge: Rob Cohen

First: Danny Goldstein

Second: Sanaë Lemoine

Third: Gabriel Oppenheim

Honorable Mentions: Malka Fleischmann, Evan Koch, Dryesha Hunt

The Judy Lee Award for Dramatic Writing
awarded to a graduate or undergraduate for the best script
(for stage, screen, television, or radio)
Judge: Alexis Alexanian

Winner: Katherine Myers

The Lilian and Benjamin Levy Award
awarded for the best review by an undergraduate
of a current play, book, film, cd, art show, or performance
Judge: Nathaniel Popkin

Winner: Evan Koch

Honorable Mention: Kaegan Sparks

The Ezra Pound Prize for Literary Translation
awarded for the best translation from any language of
either verse or prose by a graduate or undergraduate
Judge: Dian Der Hovanessian

First: Emlen Smith

Second: Zackary Wainer

Third: Valeria Tsygankova
Alexander Lessie

Creative Writing Program Prize in Nonfiction
awarded for the best nonfiction piece by an undergraduate
Judge: Barbara Hurd

First: Shira Bender

Second: Eric Karlan

Third: St. John Barned-Smith



Creative Writing Contest Winners 2007

Click
here to listen to a recording of the Creative Writing Contest Winners Reading, recorded 4/25/07 at the Kelly Writers House.

Congratulations to all the winners!

The William Carlos Williams Prize,
from The Academy of American Poets

awarded for the best original poems by a graduate student
Judge: Laura Kasischke

Winner: Kayla Rosen

The College Alumni Society Poetry Prizes
awarded to the best original poems by an undergraduate
Judge: Laura Kasischke

First: Connie Meng

Second: Philip Rocco

Third: Sam Donsky

Honorable Mentions: Pia Aliperti

The Phi Kappa Sigma Fiction Prizes
awarded for the best original fiction by an undergraduate
Judge: Rachel Pastan

First: Helene Haywoode

Second: Eric Plunkett

Third: Dan Goldstein

Honorable Mentions: Zachary Sergi, Frances Woo

The Judy Lee Award for Dramatic Writing
awarded to a graduate or undergraduate for the best script
(stage, screen, television, or radio)
Judge: Jesse Wigutow

First: Lindsey Rosin

Second: Katherine A. Myers

Third: Michael F. Bonner

The Lilian and Benjamin Levy Award
awarded for the best review by an undergraduate
of a current play, book, film, cd, or performance
Judge: Nate Chinen

Winner: Stephen Robert Morse

The Ezra Pound Prize for Literary Translation
awarded for the best translation from any language of
either verse or prose by a graduate or undergraduate
Judge: Seth Widden

Winner: Matthew Mulholland

Creative Writing Program Prize in Nonfiction
awarded for the best nonfiction piece by an undergraduate
Judge: Beth Kephart

First: Gabriel Oppenheim

Second: Sam Donsky

Third: Alicia Puglionesi

Honorable Mention: Drew Feith Tye



Creative Writing Contest Winners 2006
2006 Prize Winners' Reading

The William Carlos Williams Prize,
from The Academy of American Poets

awarded for the best original poems by a graduate student
Judge: J. Allyn Rosser

Winner: Julia Bloch

The College Alumni Society Poetry Prizes
awarded to the best original poems by an undergraduate
Judge: J. Allyn Rosser

First:
Sam Donsky

Second: Kathryn Fleishman

Third:
Pia Aliperti

Honorable Mentions: Victoria Lees, Kara Daddario

The Phi Kappa Sigma Fiction Prizes
awarded for the best original fiction by an undergraduate
Judge: Mary Kay Zuravleff

First: Alicia Oltuski

Second: David Hindin

Third: Jane Sussman

Honorable Mentions: Aichlee Bushnell, Stephen Lewis

The Judy Lee Award for Dramatic Writing
awarded to a graduate or undergraduate for the best script
(stage, screen, television, or radio)
Judge: Nick Wardigo

First: Lindsey Rosin

Second: Robert Forman

Third: Stephen Morse

The Lilian and Benjamin Levy Award
awarded for the best review by an undergraduate
of a current play, book, film, cd, or performance
Judge: Josh Tyrangiel

First: Henry (Jim) Goldblum

Second: Matt Rosenbaum

Honrable Mention: Anna Levett

The Ezra Pound Prize for Literary Translation
awarded for the best translation from any language of
either verse or prose by a graduate or undergraduate
Judge: Wyatt Mason

Winner: Adrian Khactu

Creative Writing Program Prize in Nonfiction
awarded for the best nonfiction piece by an undergraduate
Judge: Mimi Schwartz

First: Andrew Scott Dulberg

Second: Alicia Oltuski

Third: Danielle Hardoon

Honorable Mention: Eric Plunkett



Creative Writing Contest Winners 2005

The William Carlos Williams Prize,
from The Academy of American Poets

awarded for the best original poems by a graduate student
Judge: Lawrence Raab

Winner: Jason Fritz

The College Alumni Society Poetry Prizes
awarded to the best original poems by an undergraduate
Judge: Lawrence Raab

First: Jessica Purcell

Second: Sam Donsky

Third: Anna Levett

Honorable Mention: Robert MacNeill

The Phi Kappa Sigma Fiction Prizes
awarded for the best original fiction by an undergraduate
Judge: Jean McGarry

First: Jon Levin

Second: Matt Hamity

Third: (tie) Martha Cooney
Melody Kramer

Honorable Mentions: Alicia Oltuski, Eliot Sherman,
Elizabeth Thomas, Jessica Dweck, Ann Hartley

The Judy Lee Award for Dramatic Writing
awarded to a graduate or undergraduate for the best script
(stage, screen, television, or radio)
Judge: Michael Hollinger

First: Lindsey Rosin

Second: Robert Forman

Third: Jeffrey Phillips

The Lilian and Benjamin Levy Award
awarded for the best review by an undergraduate
of a current play, book, film, cd, or performance
Judge: Beth Kephart

First: Roger Tang

Second: Cassidy Hartmann

Honrable Mention: Alicia Oltuski

The Ezra Pound Prize for Literary Translation awarded for the best translation
from any language of either verse or prose by a graduate or undergraduate
Judge: Geoffrey Brock

Winner: Steven Reilly



Creative Writing Contest Winners 2004

The William Carlos Williams Prize,
from The Academy of American Poets

awarded for the best original poems by a graduate student
Judge: Christopher Buckley

Winner: Julie Brown

The College Alumni Society Poetry Prizes
awarded to the best original poems by an undergraduate
Judge: Christopher Buckley

First:
Wesley Mullen

Second: Lauren Rile Smith

Third: Jessie Schneiderman

Honorable Mention: Nicole Tabolt, Paul Martin

The Phi Kappa Sigma Fiction Prizes
awarded for the best original fiction by an undergraduate
Judge: Amy Bloom

First:
Ariel Djanikian

Second: Alicia Oltuski

Third: Martin Kathrins

Honorable Mention: Lauren Rile Smith

The Judy Lee Award for Dramatic Writing
awarded to a graduate or undergraduate for the best script (stage, screen,
television, or radio)
Judge: Tom Gibbon

First: Stacey Lloyd

Second: Flora Chang

The Lilian and Benjamin Levy Award
awarded for the best review by an undergraduate of
a current play, film, book, cd, or performance
Judge: Ann Davidon

Winner: Marisa Lore

The Ezra Pound Prize for Literary Translation
awarded for the best translation from any language of either verse or prose
by a graduate or undergraduate
Judge: Lawrence Venuti

Winner: Alicia Casarini




Creative Writing Contest Winners 2003

The William Carlos Williams Prize
from The Academy of American Poets awarded for the best original poems by a graduate student
Judge: J. T. Barbarese


Winner:
Jessica Lowenthal

The College Alumni Society Poetry Prizes
awarded to the best original poems by an undergraduate
Judge: J. T. Barbarese

First:
Jessica Schneiderman

Second: An Lam

Third: John Quattrochi, Monica Park

Honorable Mentions: Emily Truong, Andrew Kelly, Andrew Presser

The Phi Kappa Sigma Fiction Prizes
awarded for the best original fiction by an undergraduate
Judge: Jim Shepard

First:
Lindsey Palmer

Second: Rebekah Baglini

Third: Ariel Djanikian, Lauren Rile Smith

The Judy Lee Award for Dramatic Writing
awarded to a graduate or undergraduate for the best script (stage, screen, television, or radio)
Judge: Walt Vail

Winner: Elizabeth Coopersmith

The Lilian and Benjamin Levy Award
awarded for the best review by an undergraduate of a current play, film, book, cd, or performance
Judge: Anthony Tedesco

Winner: Jake Brooks

The Ezra Pound Prize for Literary Translation
awarded for the best translation from any language of either verse or prose by a graduate or undergraduate
Judge: Daniel Hoffman

Winner: Aislinn Melchior

Honorable Mention: Nick Monfort, Elizabeth Voitko




Creative Writing Contest Winners 2002

The William Carlos Williams Prize
from The Academy of American Poets awarded for the best original poems by a graduate student
Judge: Dorianne Laux

Winner: Veronica Schanoes

The College Alumni Society Poetry Prizes
awarded to the best original poems by an undergraduate
Judge: Dorianne Laux

First: Julie Brown

Second:
Jessica Murakami

Third: Kendra Kreider

Honorable Mentions: Joyce Tang

The Phi Kappa Sigma Fiction Prizes
awarded for the best original fiction by an undergraduate
Judge: Simone Zelitch

First: Lauren Rile Smith

Second: Macy Raymond

Third: Ariel Djanikian

The Judy Lee Award for Dramatic Writing
awarded to a graduate or undergraduate for the best script (stage, screen, television, or radio)
Judge: Susan Sweeney

First: Katherine Hurley

Second: Richard T. Wong

Third: Jeffrey Phillips

The Lilian and Benjamin Levy Award
awarded for the best review by an undergraduate of a current play, film, book, cd, or performance
Judge: Jonathan Grossman

Winner: Paul Farber

The Ezra Pound Prize for Literary Translation awarded for the best translation from any language of either verse or prose by a graduate or undergraduate
Judge: Len Roberts

Winner: Aislinn Melchior




Creative Writing Contest Winners 2001

The William Carlos Williams Prize
from The Academy of American Poets awarded for the best original poems by a graduate student
Judge: Jeanne Murray Walker

Winner:
Dan Edelstein

The College Alumni Society Poetry Prizes
awarded to the best original poems by an undergraduate
Judge: Jeanne Murray Walker

First: Brian Cope

Second: Shaleigh Kwok

Third: Yevgeniya Traps

Honorable Mentions: Julie Brown, Joe Breslin, Lauren Rile Smith, Seung-Hae Park

The Phi Kappa Sigma Fiction Prizes
awarded for the best original fiction by an undergraduate
Judge: Jon Volkmer

First (tie): Jeff McCall / Aaron Couch

Second: Morgan Molinoff

Third: Jason Beerman

The Judy Lee Award for Dramatic Writing
awarded to a graduate or undergraduate for the best script (stage, screen, television, or radio)
Judge: Marian X

First: Laura Sieh Chu

Second: Jeff McCall

Third: Joshua Rosenberg

The Lilian and Benjamin Levy Award
awarded for the best review by an undergraduate of a current play, film, book, cd, or performance
Judge: Cynthia Baughman

Winner: Aaron Couch

The Ezra Pound Prize for Literary Translation
awarded for the best translation from any language of either verse or prose by a graduate or undergraduate
Judge: Carolyne Wright

Winner: Seung-Hae Jasmine Park