October 2019

Tuesday, 10/1

Wednesday, 10/2

Renegade Women in Film & TV

A conversation with film critic Elizabeth Weitzman

12:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

rsvp: wh@writing.upenn.edu or (215) 746-POEM

Elizabeth Weitzman is a journalist, film critic, and the author of more than two dozen books for children and young adults. She currently covers movies for the Wrap, and was a critic for the New York Daily News for 15 years. She has interviewed hundreds of celebrities, and written about entertainment for the New York Times, the Village Voice, Marie Claire, Harper's Bazaar, Interview, and many others.

In 2015, she was named one of the top critics in New York by the Hollywood Reporter. She holds a Master's degree in Cinema Studies from NYU, and is a longstanding member of the New York Film Critics Circle and the Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators.


ZINE RAVE

5:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

Join curators of the Writers House Zine Library — Alyson del Pino (C'21) and Quinn Gruber (C'22) — for a collective zine-making event. After a quick workshop on single-sheet book forms, participants can spend all night making zines to their heart's desire. Bring material to cut up and transform (magazine, printed material, other clip art)

Thursday, 10/3

Lunch with Christine Gross-Loh

Hosted by Al Filreis

12:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

rsvp: wh@writing.upenn.edu or (215) 746-POEM

Christine Gross-Loh is a journalist and author. Her most recent book is The Path: What Chinese Philosophers Can Teach Us About the Good Life, coauthored with Professor Michael Puett. The Path, an international bestseller, has been published in nearly 30 countries. She is also the author of Parenting Without Borders: Surprising Things Parents Around the World Can Teach Us. Christine has written on history, education, philosophy, and parenting for the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, the Atlantic, the Guardian, and other outlets. She has a Ph.D. in East Asian history from Harvard University.

An Evening With Cecilia Corrigan

RealArts@Penn

5:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

hosted by: Anthony DeCurtis

Cecilia Corrigan is a writer, actor and comedian. Last year she was commissioned by Bedlam Theater Company to write and act in a contemporary, queer adaptation of Moliere's The Misanthrope, with a production slated for Spring 2020. Recent work includes Le Balm, an essayistic video series of makeup reviews, about a beauty vlogger turned aspiring political radical. She was Issue Project Room’s 2016 Artist in Residence, where she developed Motherland, a play Corrigan wrote, directed, and starred in. Her first book of poetry, Titanic, won the Madeleine P. Plonsker prize in 2014. Her work has been featured in such publications as The Village Voice, The New Yorker, The New York Times, 周末画报 (Modern Weekly), n+1, Interview Magazine, and BOMB.

Friday, 10/4

Saturday, 10/5

Sunday, 10/6

Monday, 10/7

Writing Obituaries for The New York Times: lunch with Katharine Seelye

Povich Journalism Program

12:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

Hosted by: Dick Polman
rsvp: wh@writing.upenn.edu or (215) 746-POEM

Obituaries are one of the best-read features in The New York Times, which is why Katharine Q. Seelye signed up to write them. Before taking on her new beat, "Kit" covered national news and politics for The Times since 1994. She has served since 2012 as the paper's New England bureau chief, based in Boston. Before moving to Boston, Ms. Seelye worked in the Washington bureau for 12 years and covered multiple beats, from Congress to the White House, and she slogged along “on the bus” on six presidential campaigns. She pioneered The Times's online coverage of politics, and in 2007 became the paper's first online political writer.

City planning Poetics 8

6:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

hosted by: Davy Knittle
sponsored by: Creative Ventures

City Planning Poetics is a semesterly series that invites one or more poets or more planners, designers, planning historians, or others working in the field of city planning to discuss a particular topic central to their work, to ask each other questions, and to read from their current projects.

Tuesday, 10/8

Wednesday, 10/9

Thursday, 10/10

Friday, 10/11

Saturday, 10/12

Sunday, 10/13

Monday, 10/14

What is XFICMagazine?

Creative Writing Program

12:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

rsvp: wh@writing.upenn.edu or call (215) 746-POEM

Students interested in joining XFIC, an experimental nonfiction journal sponsored by the Creative Writing Program at Penn, are invited to an information lunch with faculty adviser, Jay Kirk. XFIC will count for course credit in ENG 145 (Spring 2020). Students must submit a story pitch to be admitted. The deadline for story pitches will be announced soon. For more details, check out xfic.org.

XFIC is an experimental nonfiction journal for writers who want to test the boundaries of longform. The type of stories we most want to publish are ones where the writer is in pursuit of immediate experience. Reality as it is unfolding before your eyes. Then, in workshop, we will take the raw material of experience and transform it into compelling narrative through radical and experimental techniques. Xfic seeks writers seeking new ways to discover meaning, who seek to be more daring, more performative, more pretentious, more excellent, more virtuosic, funnier and weirder, and, most of all, who seek to directly engage reality and invent it at the same time (and who are capable of inhabiting such paradoxical spaces).

Jay Kirk has been dismantling and recreating the art of literary recreation over the past seven years in a project called AVOID THE DAY (to be published by Harper Perennial in 2019), a book that evolved out of his years as an award-winning longform journalist for magazines like Harper's, GQ, the Chicago Reader, and The New York Times Magazine. He received a Whiting Fellowship for AVOID THE DAY in 2017, and an earlier excerpt of the book appeared in Harper's Magazine as “Bartok's Monster.” While reinventing his own path as a writer, Jay has been cataloging his theories which he will be using to generate questions for the writers who join XFic 145. How do we make more radical choices? How is reality supposed to appear? How is narrative like a controlled crash? How can we generate new kinds of meaning? How can the nonfiction writer invent their own world and then, once invented, perform in that reality?


A meeting of the Writers House Planning Committee

5:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

rsvp: jalowent@writing.upenn.edu

Join us for a meeting of the Writers House Planning Committee (also know as "the Hub") — the core group of engaged students, staff, faculty, and volunteers who help make things happen at Writers House. Anyone is welcome to become a Hub member by participating in Hub activities and helping out. Members of the Hub plan programs, share ideas, and discuss upcoming projects.

Tuesday, 10/15

A poetry reading by Ahmad Almallah

Introduced by Al Filreis

6:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

Ahmad Almallah Ahmad Almallah's first book of poems is Bitter English, published this fall in the Phoenix Poets Series from the University of Chicago Press. He received the 2018 Edith Goldberg Paulson Memorial Prize for Creative Writing, and his set of poems “Recourse,” won the 2017 Blanche Colton Williams Fellowship. Some of his poems appeared in Jacket2, Track//Four, All Roads will lead You Home, Apiary, Supplement, SAND, Michigan Quarterly Review, Making Mirrors: Righting/Writing by Refugees and forthcoming in Birmingham Poetry Review. He holds a Ph.D. in Arabic Literature from IUB and an MFA in poetry from Hunter College.

Wednesday, 10/16

A conversation with Paul Hendrickson

Hosted by Al Filreis

6:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

Join us for a discussion with Paul Hendrickson, the award-winning and nationally best-selling author of Hemingway's Boat and Sons of Mississippi, whose newest book about Frank Lloyd Wright is an illuminating, pathbreaking biography that will change the way we understand the life, mind, and work of the premier American architect. Hosted by KWH Faculty Director Al Filreis, this informal conversation will allow time for questions from the audience.

Paul Hendrickson is the author of the New York Times best seller and National Book Critics Circle Award finalist, Hemingway's Boat: Everything He Loved in Life, and Lost, and Sons of Mississippi: A Story of Race and Its Legacy, which won the 2003 National Book Critics Circle Award. Since 1998 he has been on the faculty of the Creative Writing Program at the University of Pennsylvania. For two decades before that, he was a staff writer at The Washington Post. Among his other books are Looking for the Light: The Hidden Life and Art of Marion Post Wolcott (1992 finalist for the NBCC award) and The Living and the Dead: Robert McNamara and Five Lives of a Lost War (1996 finalist for the National Book Award). He has been the recipient of writing fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Lyndhurst Foundation, and the Alicia Patterson Foundation. In 2009 he was a joint visiting professor of documentary practice at Duke University and of American studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is the father of two grown sons, both of whom work in media, and he lives with his wife, Cecilia, a retired nurse, in Washington, D.C., and outside Philadelphia.

Thursday, 10/17

Speakeasy Open Mic Night

7:30 PM in the Arts Cafe

Our student-run open mic night welcomes all kinds of readings, performances, spectacles, and happenings. Bring your poetry, your guitar, your dance troupe, your award-winning essay, or your stand up comedy to share.

Friday, 10/18

Saturday, 10/19

Sunday, 10/20

Monday, 10/21

Lunch with Zaina Erhaim

Journalist at Risk Program

12:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

Co-sponsored by: The Povich Journalism Program, Perry World House, and the Center for Media at Risk
hosted by: Dick Polman
RSVP: wh@writing.upenn.edu or (215) 746-POEM

Zaina Erhaim is an award-winning Syrian journalist, working as the Communication Manager with the Institute for War and Peace Reporting. Zaina received the first Annita Auspurg Award: Rebel Woman For Peace By WILFP. She was named Journalist of the Year by Reporters without Borders in 2015, one of the ‘100 Most Powerful Arab Women' according to Arabian Business and one of the Unsung Heroes of 2016 by Reuters Thomson.


Edible Books Party

6:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

Our annual EDIBLE BOOK PARTY, held in memory of Blaze Bernstein, celebrates edible works of art inspired by books and created in kitchens. Do you like to bake? Are you a master of literary puns? This event is for you. Anyone is welcome to make or bake a book for our party. All entries should be edible (or made of food) and should, in one way or another, represent a book or book title, like: “Jane Pear” (a pear in a bonnet), “A Raisin in the Bun” (which was exactly as it sounds), “The Life of Pie” (depicting several pies in various states of being made), and “Fifty Shades of Earl Grey" (50 cups of tea, brewed to different shades). Prizes will be awarded in a number of categories (Most Delicious, Punniest, Best Use of a Single Ingredient, Most Literary, Most Literal, Best Breakfast, and Blaziest).

To enter a book or to find out more, please email wh@writing.upenn.edu.

Tuesday, 10/22

Wednesday, 10/23

A celebration of Lorene Cary's Ladysitting

6:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

Introduced by: Sara Albert, Associate Editor of SafeKidsStories.com; Sonali Deliwala; and Samira Mehta
Sponsored by: the Creative Writing Program, the Department of English, and the Center for Africana Studies

The Creative Writing Program, the Department of English, and the Center for Africana Studies present a celebration of Senior Lecturer Lorene Cary's new memoir, Ladysitting (Norton, 2019). In addition to hearing Cary read from the book, we are delighted to present an excerpt from the opera based on the memoir, The Gospel According to Nana, by Lorene Cary and Liliya Ugay, commissioned by the American Lyric Theater's Composer Librettist Development Program. Performers will include Summer Hassan with composer Liliya Ugay on piano.

Lorene Cary's non-fiction includes magazine articles and blogs as well as her best-selling memoir Black Ice, and a collection of stories for young readers, Free! Great Escapes from Slavery on the Underground Railroad. Novels include The Price of a Child, chosen as the first One Book One Philadelphia offering; ; and If Sons, Then Heirs.

Cary has written scripts for videos at The President's House exhibit on Independence Mall in Philadelphia. Her new memoir, Ladysitting: My Year with Nana at the End of Her Century, will be published by W.W. Norton Books in May 2019. An audiobook recording is planned for this summer, too. Cary is in her second year of a residency in American Lyric Theater's Composer & Librettist Development Program. In 2018, she wrote a libretto that takes off from Ladysitting. Composer Liliya Ugay set the book and has produced her own recording of The Gospel According to Nana, planned for release this Spring.

For 20 years Cary has taught fiction and non-fiction at UPenn; now she invites her students to publish on SafeKidsStories.com on Medium.com, which she created to focus on children's safety and wholeness.

In 1998 Cary founded Art Sanctuary to enrich urban Philadelphia with the excellence of black arts. To create an intentional transition, she stepped down as director in 2012. She served as president of the Union Benevolent Associationß; and from 2011-2013 as a member of Philadelphia's School Reform Commission, where, as chair of the Safety Committee, she worked to rewrite the Student Code of Conduct to eliminate zero-tolerance discipline.

Honors include: UPenn's Provost's Award for Distinguished Teaching, The Philadelphia Award, and honorary doctorates from Swarthmore, Muhlenberg, Colby, and Keene State Colleges, and Arcadia and Gwynedd Mercy Universities. In March 2017, she was featured in a Philadelphia Airport exhibit that commemorates 100 of Philadelphia's African American history makers of the 20th century.

Thursday, 10/24

A reading by Carole Bernstein and Patrick Donnelly

6:00 pm in the Arts Cafe

sponsored by: the Anonymous Endowed Fund for Poetry

Carole Bernstein is the author of three poetry collections, Buried Alive: A To-Do List (Hanging Loose Press, 2019); Familiar (Hanging Loose Press)—which J. D. McClatchy called “an exhilarating book”—and And Stepped Away from the Circle (Sow's Ear Press), winner of the Sow's Ear Chapbook contest. Her poems have been widely published, including in Antioch Review, Bridges, Chelsea, The F-Word, Paterson Literary Review, Poetry, Shenandoah, and Yale Review, and in anthologies such as American Poetry: The Next Generation and Unsettling America. She is an original member of KWH's Suppose an Eyes poetry group. A Penn graduate (C'81), she studied poetry with Daniel Hoffman and William Zaranka, and won second place in a university-wide poetry contest judged by Elizabeth Bishop (who corrected her grammar).


PATRICK DONNELLY is the author of four books of poetry, Little-Known Operas (Four Way Books, 2019), Jesus Said (a chapbook from Orison Books, 2017), Nocturnes of the Brothel of Ruin (Four Way Books, 2012, a 2013 finalist for the Lambda Literary Award), and The Charge (Ausable Press, 2003, since 2009 part of Copper Canyon Press). Donnelly is director of the Poetry Seminar at The Frost Place, Robert Frost's old homestead in Franconia, NH, now a center for poetry and the arts. Donnelly's awards include the Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission Prize for the Translation of Japanese Literature, and a 2018 Amy Clampitt Residency Award. More at www.patrickdonnellypoetry.com


Friday, 10/25

Saturday, 10/26

Sunday, 10/27

Monday, 10/28

LIVE at the Writers House

WXPN radio show

7:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

LIVE at the Writers House is a long-standing collaboration of the people of the Kelly Writers House and of WXPN (88.5 FM). Six times annually between September and April, the Writers House records a one-hour show of poetry, music, and other spoken-word art for broadcast by WXPN. “LIVE" is made possible through the generous support of BigRoc and is produced by Alli Katz.


Tuesday, 10/29

Irma Alvarez-Ccoscco and Pablo Landeo Muñoz, with Américo Mendoza-Mori

Indigenous Languages Week: Quechua Writers

6:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

Co-sponsored by: The Quechua Program, The Sachs Program for Arts Innovation, Natives at Penn

PABLO LANDEO MUÑOZ is a Peruvian writer, translator, and teacher of language and literature. He is currently a Quechua teacher at INALCO in Paris, and director of the literary magazine Atuqpa Chupan (“The fox's tail” in Quechua), which is published annually and written entirely in Quechua. In 2011, his collection of poems Los hijos de Babel appeared in Spanish. He published a collection of stories from Huancavelica in Quechua Ayacucho under the title Wankawillkain 2013, complemented by translations into Spanish and a study in Quechua. His novel Aqupampa, which appeared in 2016, is the first Quechua novel published in Quechua without translation into Spanish.

Irma Alvarez-Ccoscco is a Quechua poet and language activist from Haquira, in Peru's Apurímac region. She is a former fellow of the Artist Leadership Program at Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian. In 2018 she presented her first short-film Runasimpi Qillqaspa, about the efforts to promote literacy among Quechua native speakers in the Andes. Additionally, she has been involved in projects about the use of Quechua language in radio, software, and programmers in Peru and the United States.

Wednesday, 10/30

What does it mean to reclaim a language?

Indigenous Languages Week: Panel Discussion

12:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

Co-sponsored by: The Quechua Program, The Sachs Program for Arts Innovation, Natives at Penn
RSVP: wh@writing.upenn.edu

Dizhsa Nabani – Lengua Viva – Living Language

Indiginous Languages Week: Film Screening

6:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

Co-sponsored by: The Quechua Program, The Sachs Program for Arts Innovation, Natives at Penn

Dizhsa Nabani – Lengua Viva – Living Language is a web-based documentary film series, supported by DocuLab at Haverford College, that explores the relationship between Zapotec identity, language, and daily life. The series traces efforts of San Jerónimo Tlacochahuaya community members, including farmers, artesans, and public officials, to sustain and re-invigorate their Zapotec language.

Thursday, 10/31

Indigenous Languages Week: lunch with Pablo Landeo Muñoz

11:30 AM in the Arts Cafe

Co-sponsored by: The Quechua Program, The Sachs Program for Arts Innovation, Natives at Penn
RSVP: wh@writing.upenn.edu

PABLO LANDEO MUÑOZ is a Peruvian writer, translator, and teacher of language and literature. He is currently a Quechua teacher at INALCO in Paris, and director of the literary magazine Atuqpa Chupan (“The fox's tail” in Quechua), which is published annually and written entirely in Quechua. In 2011, his collection of poems Los hijos de Babel appeared in Spanish. He published a collection of stories from Huancavelica in Quechua Ayacucho under the title Wankawillkain 2013, complemented by translations into Spanish and a study in Quechua. His novel Aqupampa, which appeared in 2016, is the first Quechua novel published in Quechua without translation into Spanish.