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April 2009

Wednesday, 4/1

Speakeasy

Poetry, Prose, and Anything Goes!

8:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

Thursday, 4/2

Tea with Marjane Satrapi

presented by Writers Without Borders

3:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

co-sponsored by: The Women's Studies Program and the Middle East Center


Marjane Satrapi was born in 1969 in Rasht, Iran. She now lives in Paris, where she is a regular contributor to magazines and newspapers throughout the world, including The New Yorker and The New York Times. She is also the author of several children's books, Embroideries, and the internationally best-selling and award-winning comic book autobiography in two parts, Persepolis and Persepolis 2. Persepolis has been made into an animated feature film, co-written and co-directed by Satrapi, and distributed by Sony Picture Classics in 2007.


a reading by Frank Sherlock and Carol Mirakove

6:30 PM in the Arts Cafe

watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV
listen: to an audio recording of Mirakove on PennSound
listen: to an audio recording of Sherlock on PennSound

Frank Sherlock is the author of Over Here (Factory School 2009) and the co-author of Ready-To-Eat Individual (Lavender Ink 2008), a collaborative work with the Poet Laureate of Dumaine Street, Brett Evans. A duet with CAConrad entitled The City Real & Imagined: Philadelphia Poems is forthcoming from Factory School in fall 2009.

Carol Mirakove is the author of Mediated (Factory School, 2006) and Occupied (Kelsey St. Press, 2004), which won the Frances Jaffer Book Award. She is featured on the Women in the Avant-Garde CD (Narrow House) and on the track "temporary tattoos" by the DJ and producer bates45. Her poems and essays appear in journals including XCP: Cross-Cultural Poetics, Traffic, West Coast Line, The Capilano Review, Pom2, The Brooklyn Rail, Xconnect, and in the collection Visible: A Femmethology.

Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

Friday, 4/3

Marathon reading of Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse Five

3:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

Join us in our quest to become unstuck in time.

In 1969, Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. released his celebrated anti-war science fiction novel, Slaughterhouse-Five, or The Children's Crusade: A Duty-Dance With Death. The novel was soon banned from school libraries for its realism, and instated in their curriculum for its honesty. In the Writers House tradition of honoring banned books, we feature Slaughterhouse Five for the third annual marathon book reading.

Surrounded by computer screens and sounds, multimedia installations, delicious cuisine, and varied hand-made collectibles, a series of readers will gather at the Writers House to deliver in one non-linear breath, Slaughterhouse Five. Beginning at 3 PM, the volunteer readers will each take five minutes to deliver a portion of the text aloud and into the night. The rooms of the house will be transformed, and if all goes well, we will be unstuck in time by the end of the night. Feel free to stop by for just a minute, or stick around for the whole shebang!

For more information or if you would like to be a reader, please contact Allison Harris at hallison@writing.upenn.edu.


Slaughterhouse-Five is the sixty-ninth entry to the American Library Association's list of the 100 Most Frequently Challenged Books of 1990-2000. Kurt Vonnegut was mourning the follies of the world with laughter long before the term "black humorist" had been coined. In a series of fictional fables he confronted a remarkable range of topics: space, religion, creeping technology, how to love the unlovable, and even doomsday, which, as he gently observes, "could easily be next Wednesday." The popularity of Slaughterhouse Five is due, in part, to its timeliness; it deals with many issues that were vital to the late sixties: war, ecology, overpopulation, and consumerism. Klinkowitz, writing in Literary Subversions: New American Fiction and the Practice of Criticism, sees larger reasons for the book's success: "Kurt Vonnegut's fiction of the 1960s is the popular artifact which may be the fairest example of American cultural change. . . . Shunned as distastefully low-brow . . . and insufficiently commercial to suit the exploitative tastes of high-power publishers, Vonnegut's fiction limped along for years on the genuinely democratic basis of family magazine and pulp paperback circulation. Then in the late 1960s, as the culture as a whole exploded, Vonnegut was able to write and publish a novel, Slaughterhouse Five, which so perfectly caught America's transformative mood that its story and structure became best-selling metaphors for the new age."

Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

Saturday, 4/4

Sunday, 4/5

Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

Monday, 4/6

A lunch talk with Howard Fineman

Covering Obama - the First 77 Days

12:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

co-sponsored by: CPCW
Introduced by: Dick Polman
RSVP: to wh@writing.upenn.edu or call 215-573-9748
listen: to an audio recording of this event
watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV

Howard Fineman is originally from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He received an A.B from Colgate, an M.S. in journalism from Columbia, and a J.D. from the University of Louisville. In 1980 he joined the staff at Newsweek. He eventually became senior Washington Correspondent and columnist, deputy Washington Bureau Chief, and senior editor. Fineman has interviewed every major presidential candidate since 1984. Besides the campaigns, he has researched the rise of the religious right, the power of talk radio, race and politics, the Pledge of Allegiance controversy, the impact of digital technology on society, and the influence of Hollywood on politics. He has interviewed many business leaders and entertainment personalities as well.

Fineman is the bestselling author of the book The Thirteen American Arguments. Fineman's reporting has earned Newsweek numerous awards from the Magazine Publishers Association and the American Journalism Review. He is also the author of Living Politics, a column that appears in MSNBC.com and Newsweek magazine. Fineman is an NBC News Analyst, and currently reports on TV exclusively for NBC. He lives in Washington with his wife and their two children.

KWH Art Opening for Spin Glasses and Other Frustrated Systems

7:30 PM in the Arts Cafe

listen: to an audio recording of this event
watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV

This exhibition will comprise a series of wallpaper patterns designed from a constrained set of source material: 13 books cherry-picked from one afternoon's visit to Strand Bookstore. Each wall's pattern distorts graphics and schemata from a single book, ranging from mechanical drawing manuals and cathedral architectural plans to encyclopedias and texts on linguistics and condensed matter physics. In a doubled-over process of abstraction, diagrammatic information is re-translated and permutated as formal motifs into background noise.

The opening will include a group reading from the selected texts, excerpted and doctored by Michelle Taransky, Cecilia Corrigan, Timothy Leonido, Diana Hamilton, Eddie Hopely, Vladimir Zykov, Joey Yearous-Algozin, Trisha Low, Steve McLaughlin, Gregory Laynor, Ian Davisson, Johann Diedrick, and James La Marre. Reception to follow.

KWH Art thanks Strand Bookstore NYC for their generous cooperation on this project.

Please contact curator Kaegan Sparks at kwhart@writing.upenn.edu for more details.


Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

Tuesday, 4/7

PoemTalk records episode #22

Al Filreis, Wystan Curnow, Charles Bernstein, and Bob Perelman discuss Louis Zukofsky's "Reading and Talking"

4:00 PM on the third floor

Co-sponsored by: the Center for Programs in Contemporary Writing and the Poetry Foundation
rsvp: wh@writing.upenn.edu
for more information: poemtalkatkwh.blogspot.com

For each episode of PoemTalk, four friends and colleagues in the world of poetry and poetics convene to collaborate on a close (but not too close) reading of a single poem. We talk through and around the poem, sometimes beyond it, often disagreeing, always excited by what we discover as we talk, and perhaps after twenty-five minutes we've opened up the verse to a few new possibilities and have gained for a poem that interests us some new readers and listeners.

Distinguished International Scholar Wystan Curnow

"Curating as a Critical Practice"

presented by Writers Without Borders

6:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

introduced by: Charles Bernstein
rsvp: wh@writing.upenn.edu
watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV
listen: an audio recording of this lecture on Curnow's PennSound author page

"Curating as a Critical Practice" will focus on an exhibition Wystan Curnow is curating, called "Let Us Possess One World," which groups New Zealand painter Colin McCahon, Spanish painter , Antoni Tapies, the Croatian artist Mangelos, and the expatriate American painter, Cy Twombly: four contemporaries who committed the literary heresy of adding language to abstraction. Curnow will also discuss his role as an advisor/collaborator to the New Zealand conceptual artist, Billy Apple, whose survey show, Billy Apple, A History of the Brand, opens in Rotterdam at the end of May.


"Let Us Possess One World" by Colin McCahon

Wystan Curnow is a poet, curator, art critic, and essayist, and a fifth-generation New Zealander. Born in Christchurch, New Zealand in 1939, the son of a noted New Zealand poet, Curnow studied English and History at the University of Auckland, and took his PhD from the University of Pennsylvania. He is the author of Back in the USA, Cancer Daybook, Castor Bay, and Modern Colours, among other publications. You can read selections of his work here. Curnow is a famously great teacher; his course on modern and contemporary American poetry, which Curnow has taught to several generations of New Zealanders, is perhaps the most well respected such course in the world. While teaching poetry as an eminence, he has all along worked on the intersection of Image and Text, created numerous special exhibits, promoted avant-garde artists, and spoken widely on curatorial practice.

The University of Pennsylvania established the Distinguished International Scholars program to promote global engagement in undergraduate education and deepen Penn's ties to the world's leading universities and scholars. The program offers Penn faculty the opportunity to invite a scholar from another nation to visit Penn and participate in the intellectual and cultural life of campus through such activities as visiting courses, offering public lectures, attending departmental seminars/workshops, and participating in programs through College Houses and Academic Services.


Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

Wednesday, 4/8

Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

Thursday, 4/9

Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

Friday, 4/10

Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

Saturday, 4/11

Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

Sunday, 4/12

Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

Monday, 4/13

A meeting of the Writers House Planning Committee (the "Hub")

5:30 PM in the Arts Cafe

RSVP: to jalowent@writing.upenn.edu

From the time of its founding in 1995-1996, the Kelly Writers House has been run more or less collectively by members of its community. Our original team of intrepid founders — the group of students, faculty, alumni, and staff who wanted to create an independent haven for writers and supporters of contemporary writing in any genre — took for themselves the name "the hub." "Hub" was the generic term given by Penn's Provost, President, and other planners who hoped that something very innovative would be done at 3805 Locust Walk to prove the viability of the idea that students, working with others, could create an extracurricular learning community around common intellectual and creative passions. To this day, the Writers House Planning Committee refers to itself as "the hub" — the core of engaged faculty, student, staff, and alumni volunteers from whom the House's creative energy and vitality radiates.

Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

Tuesday, 4/14

Distinguished International Scholar Wystan Curnow

a poetry reading

presented by Writers without Borders

6:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

introduced by: Charles Bernstein
rsvp: wh@writing.upenn.edu
watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV
listen: an audio recording of this lecture on Curnow's PennSound author page

The University of Pennsylvania established the Distinguished International Scholars program to promote global engagement in undergraduate education and deepen Penn's ties to the world's leading universities and scholars. The program offers Penn faculty the opportunity to invite a scholar from another nation to visit Penn and participate in the intellectual and cultural life of campus through such activities as visiting courses, offering public lectures, attending departmental seminars/workshops, and participating in programs through College Houses and Academic Services.


Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

Wednesday, 4/15

The Final Speakeasy of the Year – Speakeasy Speakeasy, the ultimate in Speakeasy

Poetry, Prose, Anything Goes! in theme!

8:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

For more information, contact whaskspeakeasy@writing.upenn.edu.

Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

Thursday, 4/16

A poetry reading by Rachel Zolf

5:30 PM in the Arts Cafe

co-sponsored by: CPCW
introduced by: Rachel Levitsky
watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV
listen: an audio recording of this event on Zolf's PennSound author page

Rachel Zolf's most recent book of poetry, Human Resources (Coach House, 2007), won the 2008 Trillium Book Award for Poetry and was shortlisted for a Lambda Literary Award. Previous collections include Shoot and Weep (Nomados, 2008), from Human Resources (Belladonna, 2005) and Masque (Mercury, 2004). Her poetry and essays have appeared in such journals as Xcp: Cross-Cultural Poetics, West Coast Line, Capilano Review and Open Letter and in the anthologies Prismatic Publics: Innovative Canadian Women's Poetry and Poetics (Coach House, 2009) and Shift & Switch: New Canadian Poetry. She was the founding poetry editor of The Walrus magazine and has edited several books by other poets, including Rachel Levitsky's NEIGHBOR (Ugly Duckling, 2009). She is currently the recipient of a Chalmers Arts Fellowship supporting a poetic project on competing knowledges in Israel-Palestine, entitled The Neighbour Procedure (forthcoming Coach House, 2010).


Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

Friday, 4/17

Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

Saturday, 4/18

Sunday, 4/19

A workshop reading of Jason Butler's prize-winning play Mistaken

For the fifth year in a row, the Front Row Theatre Company and the Kelly Writers House have sponsored a playwriting fellowship. Please join us for a public reading and discussion of the winning play, to help prepare the work for a capstone staged reading. More information is available at www.frontrowtheatreco.com.

Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

Monday, 4/20

A workshop presentation of "Dandelion Momma," a play by Greg Romero

7:00 PM in the garden of the Kelly Writers House



In "Dandelion Momma," an eight year-old girl takes care of wayward dandelions and sees the lights inside of people. A farm girl and a writer search for life inside of each other while planting seeds in the hardened soil of the Great Depression. A one hundred year-old woman reflects on her life through broken pieces of memory. The ground becomes harder, the girl becomes tired, the air becomes heavier, and something new must be born.

Greg Romero's plays have been produced off-off Broadway by City Attic Theatre and Working Man's Clothes Productions, and across the country by Salvage Vanguard Theater, Rude Mechanicals Theatre Collective, Theater In My Basement, Specific Gravity Ensemble, Actors Theatre of Louisville, and in elevators, porches, warehouses, loft apartments, punk stages, museums, basement crawl spaces, and public bathrooms. Romero has been commissioned by The Cardboard Box Collaborative, Austin Script Works, and Audacity Theatre Lab, and is a member of Philadelphia Dramatists Center, and The Dramatists Guild of America. He has been a finalist for the Heideman Award, a semi-finalist for the Princess Grace Award and his works have been published by Heinemann Press and Playscripts, Inc. Romero received a BA in Liberal Arts from the Louisiana Scholars College and an MFA in Playwriting from The University of Texas-Austin where he held the James A. Michener Fellowship. Most recently, Romero was selected as the first-ever Resident Writer of the ArtsEdge Residency, created by The Kelly Writers House and The University of Pennsylvania.


Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

Tuesday, 4/21

A reading of Book I of The Iliad

presented by Bob Perelman's ENGL 269 class

12:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

listen: to an audio recording of this event
watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV


A reading and conversation with Adina Hoffman

6:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

Co-sponsored by: the Creative Writing program
listen: to an audio recording of this event
watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV

Adina Hoffman is an American who moved to Jerusalem with her husband after graduating from college. Her first book, House of Windows: Portraits from a Jerusalem Neighborhood, provides readers with an a intimate look into life in contemporary Israel. It describes the personalities and experiences of the inhabitants of Musrara, a neighborhood on the border between East and West Jerusalem. My Happiness Bears No Relation to Happiness: A Poet's Life in the Palestinian Century is the biography of Palestinian poet, Taha Muhammad Ali, who was born in 1931 in Saffuriyya and fled it in 1948 when it was captured by Israel during the Arab-Israeli war. In the Prelude to My Happiness Bears No Relation to Happiness, Adina Hoffman writes, "no one has ever written a biography of a Palestinian writer before, in any language (including Arabic), and that—together with the fact that most Western readers have little if any experience of that culture and literature—brings with it extra responsibility." Arabic scholar Michael Sells names the book as "among the five 'must read' books on the Israel-Palestine tragedy." Hoffman's essays and criticism have appeared in the Nation, the Washington Post, and the Times Literary Supplement and on the BBC. She is one of the founders and editors of Ibis Editions, and currently resides in Jerusalem.


Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

Wednesday, 4/22

CPCW Literary Journalism Fellowship Program

featuring Fellowship winners Jess Yu and Chaia Werger, and discussants Lee Eisenberg and Marilyn Johnson (C'76)

5:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

co-sponsored by: the Center for Programs in Contemporary Writing
reception: to follow immediately afterward
listen: to an audio recording of this event
watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV

Each year, the Center for Programs in Contemporary Writing sponsors two fellowships for writers of literary or "long-form" journalism. Fellowship recipients set out to write a 4,000-word nonfiction piece of ambitiously reported long-form journalism that is of publishable quality. This year's Fellowship recipients, Chaia Werger and Jessica Yu, will read from their work, then join a panel discussion with eminent editor-journalists Lee Eisenberg and Marilyn Johnson.

Marilyn Johnson is the author of The Dead Beat: Lost Souls, Lucky Stiffs, The Perverse Pleasures of Obituaries (HarperPerennial, 2007) and the forthcoming This Book is Overdue! How Librarians and Cybrarians Can Save the World (Harper, 2009). She has written articles, poetry, essays, book reviews, obituaries, and humor for many publications, and was a staff writer for Life; she edited fiction and non-fiction at Esquire and other magazines. She graduated from Penn in 1976, has an MA in writing from UNH, and has taught writing at UNH, The Ohio State University, and Columbia Journalism School. Johnson's website www.marilynjohnson.net posts excerpts from some of her celebrity obituaries and links to interviews about The Dead Beat; soon it will feature excerpts from This Book is Overdue! about her adventures with librarians on Second Life, Radical Reference librarians, the dog librarian and the boxing archivist.

Penn alumnus Lee Eisenberg served as editor in chief at Esquire before overseeing creative development at TIME magazine. Eisenberg's book, The Number: A Completely Different Way to Think about the Rest of Your Life (Free Press, 2006) is a New York Times bestseller and the buzz of professionals and financial industry insiders everywhere.

Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

Thursday, 4/23

A lunchtime congregation concerning the topography of testimony

featuring Cecilia Corrigan, Ned Eisenberg, Kim Eisler, Trisha Low, Kaegan Sparks and Junior Fellow Matthew Abess

12:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

rsvp: RSVP required to wh@writing.upenn.edu or call 215-573-9748.
listen: to an audio recording of this event
watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV

Join us for a lunch talk concerning The Topography of Testimony. The program will touch, in turn, upon the subjects of: afflicted screaming, disastrous writing, trauma circuits, reading habits, and memory ruins.

Creative Writing Contest Winners Reading

6:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

listen: to an audio recording of this event
watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV

A reception for all will follow the reading.

For deadlines and more information about CPCW contests, prizes and fellowships, please see: http://writing.upenn.edu/awards/.

Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

Friday, 4/24

Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

Saturday, 4/25

KWH Glitterati meeting

2:00 - 5:00 PM in Room 202

For more information contact Michelle Taransky at taransky@writing.upenn.edu.

Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

Sunday, 4/26

Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

Monday, 4/27

A Reading by Mary Gordon

Kelly Writers House Fellows Program

6:30 PM in the Arts Cafe

rsvp: please RSVP to whfellow@writing.upenn.edu or call 215-573-9749
watch: this program will be broadcast live on KWH-TV

Funded by a grant from Paul Kelly, the Kelly Writers House Fellows program enables us to realize two unusual goals. We want to make it possible for the youngest writers and writer-critics to have sustained contact with authors of great accomplishment in an informal atmosphere. We also want to resist the time-honored distinction -- more honored in practice than in theory -- between working with eminent writers on the one hand and studying literature on the other.

Mary Gordon's body of work — novels, short stories, essays, and personal memoirs — paints a rich picture of the complexities of faith, morals, politics, and religious and cultural heritage in a contemporary landscape. Regarded as one of the leading chroniclers of modern Catholic life in America, Ms. Gordon's writing deals with growing up as a Roman Catholic and with the nature of goodness and piety as expressed within that tradition.

Ms. Gordon has won three O. Henry Awards. She has also won the Story Prize, the Guggenheim Fellowship, the Kafka Prize, and the New York Public Library Literary Lion Award. In 2008 she was named the New York State Author. Ms. Gordon is the Millicent C. McIntosh Professor of Writing at Barnard College.

The author of several bestselling novels, including Final Payments, The Company of Women, and Pearl, Ms. Gordon has published a book of novellas, The Rest of Life, a collection of stories, Temporary Shelter, and a book of essays, Good Boys and Dead Girls. She has also written The Shadow Man, a memoir about her father, a Jewish convert to Catholicism who died when she was seven, and most recently Circling My Mother, about her mother, who struggled with senile dementia in the last years of her life. In its review of Circling My Mother, the Boston Globe wrote, "Mary Gordon is a brilliant writer in all senses of that word; a gifted craftsperson, original scholar, unflinching observer of self and others."

Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

Tuesday, 4/28

A Reading by Mary Gordon

Kelly Writers House Fellows Program

10:00 AM in the Arts Cafe

rsvp: please RSVP to whfellow@writing.upenn.edu or call 215-573-9749
Watch: this program will be broadcast live on KWH-TV

Funded by a grant from Paul Kelly, the Kelly Writers House Fellows program enables us to realize two unusual goals. We want to make it possible for the youngest writers and writer-critics to have sustained contact with authors of great accomplishment in an informal atmosphere. We also want to resist the time-honored distinction -- more honored in practice than in theory -- between working with eminent writers on the one hand and studying literature on the other.

Mary Gordon's body of work — novels, short stories, essays, and personal memoirs — paints a rich picture of the complexities of faith, morals, politics, and religious and cultural heritage in a contemporary landscape. Regarded as one of the leading chroniclers of modern Catholic life in America, Ms. Gordon's writing deals with growing up as a Roman Catholic and with the nature of goodness and piety as expressed within that tradition.

Ms. Gordon has won three O. Henry Awards. She has also won the Story Prize, the Guggenheim Fellowship, the Kafka Prize, and the New York Public Library Literary Lion Award. In 2008 she was named the New York State Author. Ms. Gordon is the Millicent C. McIntosh Professor of Writing at Barnard College.

The author of several bestselling novels, including Final Payments, The Company of Women, and Pearl, Ms. Gordon has published a book of novellas, The Rest of Life, a collection of stories, Temporary Shelter, and a book of essays, Good Boys and Dead Girls. She has also written The Shadow Man, a memoir about her father, a Jewish convert to Catholicism who died when she was seven, and most recently Circling My Mother, about her mother, who struggled with senile dementia in the last years of her life. In its review of Circling My Mother, the Boston Globe wrote, "Mary Gordon is a brilliant writer in all senses of that word; a gifted craftsperson, original scholar, unflinching observer of self and others."

A Reading for Greg Djanikian's Poetry Class

6:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

listen: to an audio recording of this event
watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV

Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

Wednesday, 4/29

Hub End-of-Year party

5:00 PM in the Garden

Each spring, at the end of the semester, the Writers House Planning Committee comes together to celebrate another year gone by. We toast and roast old friends and recognize the contributions of various Hub members to this incredible project. To see and hear more about the Hub party, go here.

Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

Thursday, 4/30

Fellows Class "Final Words"

2:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

Rhymes and Misdemeanors VI

featuring readers from Suppose an Eyes and the Penn & Pencil Club

6:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

Every year, the writing groups Suppose an Eyes and the Penn & Pencil Club come together for a celebratory reading. Featured readers this year are: Jax Peters Lowell, George McDermott, Carole Bernstein, Joseph Myers, Sean Oliveira, Francesca Costanzo, Helen Sewell Johnson, Don Johnson, Sharon Black, Beth Feldman Brandt, Sarah Allred, K. T. Adams, and Pat Green.

Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)