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February 2010

Monday, 2/1

A lunch discussion with Jeff Haas

The Assassination of Fred Hampton

12:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

co-sponsored by: Creative Writing
rsvp: to wh@writing.upenn.edu or call 215-573-9749
listen: to an audio recording of this event
watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV

Attorney Jeff Haas has spent his career working for justice. In 1969 he and three other lawyers set up the People's Law Office, whose clients included the Black Panthers, SDS, and other political activists. Haas went on to handle cases involving prisoners' rights, police torture, and the wrongfully accused. He lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico, with his wife and children and continues to represent victims of police brutality.

The Assassination of Fred Hampton is attorney Jeff Haas's personal account of the eighteen-month trial in which he and People's Law Office partner Flint Taylor pursued Hampton's assassins, ultimately prevailing over FBI stonewalling and unlimited government resources bent on hiding the conspiracy that led to Hampton's death. The book not only tells the story of justice delivered but also puts Hampton in a new light as a dynamic community leader whose dedication to his people and to truth telling inspired the young lawyers of the People's Law Office, solidifying their lifelong commitment to fighting injustice.


Live at the writers house presents the authors of Philly Fiction

a live taping featuring John Carroll, Christine Flanagan, Elise Juska, Benjamin Matvey, Kelly McQuain.

8:00 PM on WXPN

hosted by: Michaela Majoun
produced by: Erin Gautsche

LIVE at the Writers House is a long-standing collaboration between the Kelly Writers House and WXPN FM (88.5). Six times annually between September and April, Michaela Majoun hosts a one-hour broadcast of poetry, music, and other spoken-word art, along with one musical guest, all from our Arts Cafe onto the airwaves at WXPN. LIVE is made possible by generous support from BigRoc. For more information, contact Producer Erin Gautsche (gautsche@writing.upenn.edu).

Tuesday, 2/2

Wednesday, 2/3

A reading by Lynn Levin and Lise Funderburg

6:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

co-sponsored by: Creative Writing
listen: to an audio recording of this event
watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV


Poet, writer, and translator, Lynn Levin is the author of three collections of poems, Fair Creatures of an Hour (2009), Imaginarium (2005)/, and A Few Questions about Paradise (2000), all published by Loonfeather Press. Imaginarium was a finalist for ForeWord Magazine's Book of the Year Award. Lynn Levin's poems have appeared in Ploughshares, Washington Square Review, 5 AM, Peregrine, and Boulevard. She teaches creative writing at the University of Pennsylvania and at Drexel University, where she also produces the award-winning TV show, The Drexel InterView.

Lise Funderburg earned her BA at Reed College, her masters at the Columbia University School of Journalism, and is a creative nonfiction writing instructor in at the University of Pennsylvania and Rutgers. Funderburg is a regular contributor toO, The Oprah Magazine and has written for such publications as The New York Times, TIME, The Philadelphia Inquirer, The Nation, Salon, and Prevention. In the New York Times review of Funderburg's first book, Black, White, Other: Biracial Americans Talk about Race and Identity, Kyoko Mori said it was "an example of how we can talk about race with feeling, humor, and dignity." Her latest book, Pig Candy: Taking My Father South, Taking My Father Home (Free Press), is a contemplation of life, death, and barbecue. Of Pig Candy, writer Daniel Mendelsohn says, "Funderburg has achieved something very remarkable in contemporary memoir: a personal narrative that is crisply intelligent rather than cleverly self-satisfied, deeply and meaningfully emotional rather than soppily sentimental." And Edwidge Danticat describes Pig Candy as "a candid and moving memoir of a daughter's deep love for her father both when he is most difficult to love and impossible not to."


Thursday, 2/4

EII: A Playtext

6:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

listen: to an audio recording of this event
watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV

A staged reading of selections of EII: A Playtext, by Lee Huttner, this year's Joan Harrison Prize winner. EII challenges our ideas about can and should be put into a script; mucking around with Christopher Marlowe's Edward II, it experiments with language, textuality, and the relation between space, word, and image.

Friday, 2/5

Saturday, 2/6

Sunday, 2/7

Monday, 2/8

A lunch program with Annette John-Hall

"Writing about Philadelphians"

presented by the Sylvia Kauders lunch series

12:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

introduced by: Dick Polman
rsvp: to wh@writing.upenn.edu or call 215-746-POEM
listen: to an audio recording of this event
watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV


Annette John-Hall is a metro columnist for The Inquirer. She was previously a features reporter and columnist focusing on music, film television and pop culture. A native of Berkeley, Calif., she covered professional, college and high school sports at the San Jose Mercury News, the Rocky Mountain News in Denver and the Oakland Tribune.

Sylvia W. Kauders (CW'42), a regular attendee of our lunchtime programming, established the Sylvia W. Kauders Endowment Fund to support a series of intimate programs at the Writers House each semester with writers of nonfiction.

A meeting of the Writers House Planning Committee (the "Hub")

5:30 PM in the Arts Cafe

RSVP: to gautsche@writing.upenn.edu

From the time of its founding in 1995-1996, the Kelly Writers House has been run more or less collectively by members of its community. Our original team of intrepid founders — the group of students, faculty, alumni, and staff who wanted to create an independent haven for writers and supporters of contemporary writing in any genre — took for themselves the name "the hub." "Hub" was the generic term given by Penn's Provost, President, and other planners who hoped that something very innovative would be done at 3805 Locust Walk to prove the viability of the idea that students, working with others, could create an extracurricular learning community around common intellectual and creative passions. To this day, the Writers House Planning Committee refers to itself as "the hub" — the core of engaged faculty, student, staff, and alumni volunteers from whom the House's creative energy and vitality radiates. Go here to get a sense of what we do; go here for sound clips and photos from our end-of-year party; go here for a list of campus publications.

Tuesday, 2/9

A reading by fiction writer Sam Apple

POSTPONED

introduced by: Max Apple
co-sponsored by: Creative Writing

This program has been POSTPONED due to inclement weather.

Sam Apple's literary achievements range from publishing novels like Schlepping Through the Alps (2005, Random House), which was a finalist for the PEN America Award, and receiving the 2005 Faux-Faulkner award. Currently the publisher and editor of The Faster Times, Apple was also the editor-in-chief of New Voices Magazine. His writing has been featured in many publications, including The New York Times Magazine, The Financial Times Magazine, ESPN The Magazine and Slate. In 2009, he published his second novel, American Parent: My Strange and Surprising Adventures in Modern Babyland (Random House).



Wednesday, 2/10

Speakeasy: Poetry, Prose, and Anything Goes!

8:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

Speakeasy is an open mic night held at the Kelly Writers House every other Wednesday evening. It's an opportunity for writers to share their work, or the work of others, in a friendly setting. Speakeasy was founded in 1997 and continues to be an important part of the regular Writers House programming series. We welcome poets, storytellers, singers, musicians, and anything in between to share their voices with us in the Arts Cafe twice a month. As always: Poetry, prose, anything goes!

Thursday, 2/11

A lunch talk with Maira Kalman

12:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

co-sponsored by: the Institute of Contemporary Art

This event has been RESCHEDULED for April 22, 2010.

Maira Kalman is an award-winning artist, illustrator, and product designer. She has illustrated numerous covers for The New Yorker magazine and has written and illustrated more than a dozen children's books. Her articles and illustrations have appeared in The New York Times, Newsweek, Interview, and many other publications. Kalman also illustrated a special edition of Strunk & White's The Elements of Style (Penguin, 2005). Kalman has designed products for the Museum of Modern Art under the M&Co. label, fabric for Isaac Mizrahi, accessories for Kate Spade, and sets for Mark Morris Dance Group. A teacher of graduate design at the School of Visual Arts, she lives in New York with her two children and a dog.

Holocaust remembrance

a reading and discussion with survivor-writer Michael Stolowitzky

3:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

We're honored to host a special Holocaust remembrance discussion with survivor-writer Michael Stolowitzky. Stolowitzky, the only son of a wealthy Jewish family in Poland, was just three years old at the start of WWII. His escape from Poland to Palestine is chronicled in Gertruda's Oath, a page-turning true story that recalls the power and poignancy of Schindler's List. Join us for a discussion his survivor story.

This program is supported by Harvey and Linda Levine, in honor of Selena Levine and dedicated to Leo and Frieda Feld and Benjamin and Sally Levine.

Friday, 2/12

A lunch talk with Rebecca Walker

12:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

co-sponsored by: Penn Consortium of Undergraduate Women and Penn Women's Center
RSVP: to wh@writing.upenn.edu
listen: to an audio recording of this event
watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV

Rebecca Walker is an award-winning speaker, teacher, and bestselling author. She presents ideas about race, class, culture, gender, and the evolution of the human family that challenge ideological rigidity and encourage fresh approaches to enduring conflicts. In addition to her memoir and anthologies, read Rebecca's critical reviews in BookForum and the Washington Post Book World; journalism in Newsweek, Corriere della Sera, and the GuardianUK; personal essays in Glamour, Real Simple, and Child; and interviews with artists and political figures in Interview, Vibe, and Spin. Her blog, "This Writer's Life," launches on the Huffington Post in 2010.

Rebecca is a graduate of Yale and the recipient of an Honorary Doctorate of Letters from the North Carolina School of the Arts. She has appeared on The Today Show, Charlie Rose, CNN, ABC News, Good Morning America, and Oprah. Time Magazine named her one of the fifty most influential leaders of her generation.


Saturday, 2/13

Sunday, 2/14

A screening of Valentine's Day

7:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

listen: to an audio recording of this event
watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV


Monday, 2/15

A reading by Joyce Carol Oates

Kelly Writers House Fellows Program

6:30 PM in the Arts Cafe

rsvp: SEATING STRICTLY LIMITED; please RSVP to whfellow@writing.upenn.edu or call 215-573-9749
watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV
listen: to an audio recording of this event

Funded by a grant from Paul Kelly, the Kelly Writers House Fellows program enables us to realize two unusual goals. We want to make it possible for the youngest writers and writer-critics to have sustained contact with authors of great accomplishment in an informal atmosphere. We also want to resist the time-honored distinction — more honored in practice than in theory — between working with eminent writers on the one hand and studying literature on the other.

The author of many distinguished books in several genres, Joyce Carol Oates is one of America's most versatile contemporary writers. In addition to numerous novels and short story collections, she has published poetry, plays, literary criticism, and the book-length essay On Boxing.

Ms. Oates's writing has earned her much praise and many awards, including the 2005 Prix Femina, France's literary prize for the best novel published in their country, for The Falls, 2004 Fairfax Prize for Lifetime Achievement in the Literary Arts, PEN/Malamud Award for Excellence in short fiction, the Rosenthal Award from the American Academy - Institute of Arts and Letters, a Guggenheim Fellowship, the O'Henry Prize for Continued Achievement in the Short Story, the National Book Award for her novel Them, and in 1978, membership in the American Academy-Institute. What I Lived For was nominated for the 1995 PEN/Faulkner Award. In 1999 Ms. Oates was nominated for the Nobel Prize for the third time. She is the Roger S. Berlind Distinguished Professor of the Humanities at Princeton University.

Often Ms. Oates's vision is that of presumably ordinary American families who experience common yet intense emotions and relationships and who frequently encounter violence. Her ambition is to create a fictional world that mirrors the ambiguity and felt experience of the real world of her time. Critic James Atlas said that, "[t]he engine of Oates's immense talent is powered by a fecund imagination and an immense knowledge of literature, as all her writing - both fiction and nonfiction - made plain."

Tuesday, 2/16

A Brunch Conversation with Joyce Carol Oates

Kelly Writers House Fellows Program

10:00 AM in the Arts Cafe

rsvp: SEATING STRICTLY LIMITED; please RSVP to whfellow@writing.upenn.edu or call 215-573-9749

Funded by a grant from Paul Kelly, the Kelly Writers House Fellows program enables us to realize two unusual goals. We want to make it possible for the youngest writers and writer-critics to have sustained contact with authors of great accomplishment in an informal atmosphere. We also want to resist the time-honored distinction—more honored in practice than in theory—between working with eminent writers on the one hand and studying literature on the other.

A talk by David Antin

"Rethinking Freud – Taking Freud out of Psychoanalysis"

3:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV
listen: to the MP3 of this recording at David Antin's PennSound Author Page

David Antin is a poet, performance artist, art and literary critic internationally known for his "talk pieces" -- improvisational blends of comedy, story and social commentary that critics have described as "a cross between Lenny Bruce and Ludwig Wittgenstein" or alternately as "a blend of Mark Twain and Gertrude Stein." New Directions has published three books of these "talk pieces" -- Talking at the Boundaries (1976), Tuning (1984), and What it Means to Be Avant-Garde (1993). Tuning was awarded the prize for poetry for 1984 by the PEN Center of Los Angeles. Much of his earlier work was collected in Selected Poems 1963-1973 published by Sun and Moon Press in 1991. Antin has performed at the Whitney Museum, the Guggenheim, the Museum of Modern Art, and the Getty Center in the U.S., at the Centre Pompidou and the Musée d'Art Moderne in Paris, and performed both improvised and scripted verbal works for radio and television. Antin has designed Skypoems, short texts he describes as "commercials that aren't selling anything," that have been skytyped over Los Angeles and San Diego, and Word Walks for urban parks, as well as an ongoing electronic poem for an airport. He received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the NEH and was awarded the PEN Los Angeles Award for Poetry in 1984. He has published criticism in most major art and literary journals, and his work has been written about in The Poetics of Indeterminacy, Marjorie Perloff (Princeton, 1981); The Object of Performance, Henry Sayre (Chicago, 1989); The Jazz Text, Charles O. Hartman (Princeton, 1991). An extensive interview with him has been published in Some Other Frequency: Interviews with Innovative American Authors, ed. Larry McCaffery, U. Penn. 1996, and the Review of Contemporary Fiction devoted its entire Spring 2001 issue to his work. Dalkey Archive recently republished his 1972 book talking (originally published by Kulchur Foundation) with a Preface by Marjorie Perloff and a Postface by David Antin. Granary Books recently published A Conversation with David Antin, the text of a three month email conversation between David Antin and Charles Bernstein. The most recent works include two new collection of talk pieces -- I Never Knew What Time It Was (UC Press, 2005) and John Cage Uncaged is Still Cagey (Singing Horse, 2005).


Wednesday, 2/17

George Borge Smorgasborg

6:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

organized by: Max McKenna
listen: to an audio recording of this event
watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV


The George Borge Smorgasbord is a celebratory discussion and exploration of the great Jorge Luis Borges and his oeuvre. The Smorgasbord will approach all things Borges from an abundance of angles—the labyrinthine, the Babelian, the intertextual—to situate the Argentine writer with relation to the literary canon he so challenged and shaped. With discussions by Paul Benzon, Tim Carmody, Mark Inchoco, Sarah Kerman, and Josephine Park.


Thursday, 2/18

Adachi Tomomi and Tianna Kennedy

EDIT: Processing Improvisatory Writing Technologies

6:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

co-sponsored by: Writers Without Borders
watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV
listen: to an audio recording of this event on the EDIT Series PennSound page

EDIT is a roving events series pairing innovative performances with focused critical responses toward an exploration of editorial strategies in contemporary writing and the arts.

Adachi Tomomi (family name is Adachi), born in Kanazawa, Japan in 1972, is a performer, composer, sound poet, installation artist, and occasional theater director. He studied philosophy and aesthetics at Waseda University in Tokyo. His improvised poetics include voice, live electronics and self-made instruments. The "Tomomin"—a handmade electric instrument—is familiar to many musicians. His performances of contemporary music by John Cage, Cornelius Cardew, Christian Wolff, Tom Johnson, Dieter Schnebel, Takahashi Yuji, Yuasa Joji and Fluxus have included world and Japanese premiers. He has performed with numerous musicians including Jaap Blonk, Nicolas Collins, Carl Stone, Sakata Akira, Ichiyanagi Toshi, Tanaka Yumiko, dj sniff, Jerome Noetinger, Furudate Tetsuo, Dickson Dee, Zbigniew Karkowski, Johannes Bergmark, Erhart hirt, Makigami Koichi, Butch Morris, Jon Rose, Otomo Yoshihide in Japan, United States and Europe. His work has been presented variously at IRCAM/Centre Pompidou, Waker Art Center, STEIM, Experimental Intermedia Foundation, Tonic, The National Museum of Art Osaka, Super Deluxe, Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography, La Mama Theatre Melbourne, Anthology Film Archives, 21th Century Museum of Contemporary Art Kanazawa and Vooruit. Currently, he is focusing his activities on solo performance (with voice, sensors, computer, self-made instruments), sound poetry (especially to the unknown great Japanese sound poetry tradition), video installation, and workshop-style ensembles with non-professional voice and instruments.

Tianna Kennedy has a Masters in Performance Studies from New York University. She has taught courses in Radio Culture and Sight, Sound, and Motion at Brooklyn College in the department of Television and Radio. She is interested in public art and geography, and has written for liveartmagazine, Reckless Sleepers, and Glowlab. She was a founding member of the Empty Vessel Project (an Action, Art and Design Center); free103point9, (a transmission arts nonprofit); and the August Sound Coalition (which fostered community organizing throug LPFM). In 2009 she project-managed a successful pirate intervention/performance on the Venice Biennale originating in Slovenia with Swimming Cities of Serenissima (swimmingcities.org). Finally, she is a cellist and wood-finisher by trade.


Friday, 2/19

Saturday, 2/20

Sunday, 2/21

Monday, 2/22

LIVE at the Writers House features Leeway Award Winners

7:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

hosted by: Michaela Majoun
produced by: Erin Gautsche
RSVP: to gautsche@writing.upenn.edu
listen: to an audio recording of this event

The Leeway Foundation is committed to art making as an integral part of social change, to movement building, and anti-oppression work where Leeway is accountable, accessible, part of and governed by, the communities Leeway's programs support. Leeway is guided by the values of fearlessness in action, speech, and self-examination and commits to breaking down boundaries and barriers with creativity, respect, and openness to the process. All performers on this LIVE at the Writers House are winners of Leeway's Transformation or Art and Change grants.

Elizabeth Castiglione is an artist and writer whose work focuses on the tensions between art-making, motherhood, and mental illness. She received her B.A. from Yale University and her M.F.A. from the University of Washington in Seattle. She has taught art at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia. In 2006 she was diagnosed with bipolar disorder, after struggling with her moods for many years. With therapy and medication, she has begun to successfully juggle the myriad challenges of being an artist, a mother, and a person with mental illness. She currently works part-time at a local Friends school. Elizabeth has kept a journal throughout her life, in which she writes and draws. After her children were born, she began drawing them as they slept. Over a hundred of these images, along with journal entries, form the basis for her book, Stumbling in the Dark: Art, Motherhood, and Mental Illness.

Novelist, poet, short story writer, memoirist, gluten-free author and activist, Jax Peters Lowell is driven by the idea that a single voice is a powerful catalyst for social healing and change. She believes that in caring for characters, whether real or imagined, and being moved, shocked, or outraged by their fates, we widen our views and move in directions not possible in the stridency of political argument. Her novel Mothers, a Barnes & Noble Discover Book, was published by St. Martin's Press and optioned by Paramount Pictures and Goldie Hawn's Cherry Alley Productions. Lowell has been interviewed on NPR's Radio Times, The Louise Collins Show on WHWH Radio Princeton, was a featured speaker at the James A. Michener Library and participated in Philadelphia's Third Annual Celebration for Literacy. Gluten-free since l981, Lowell penned the now classic Against The Grain and its best-selling follow-up, The Gluten-Free Bible, both published by Henry Holt.

Tuesday, 2/23

Theorizing presents Natalie Melas

"The Politics of Time and Modernist Form in Aimé Césaire and Wifredo Lam"

6:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

co-sponsored by: Latitudes
listen: to an audio recording of this event
watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV


Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

Wednesday, 2/24

Speakeasy: Poetry, Prose, and Anything Goes!

8:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

listen: to an audio recording of this event
watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV

Speakeasy is an open mic night held at the Kelly Writers House every other Wednesday evening. It's an opportunity for writers to share their work, or the work of others, in a friendly setting. Speakeasy was founded in 1997 and continues to be an important part of the regular Writers House programming series. We welcome poets, storytellers, singers, musicians, and anything in between to share their voices with us in the Arts Cafe twice a month. As always: Poetry, prose, anything goes!

Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

Thursday, 2/25

A discussion with Howard Marks

2:15 PM in the Arts Cafe

introduced by: Val Ross
co-sponsored by: Critical Writing
RSVP to: wh@writing.upenn.edu or call 215-746-POEM
listen: to an audio recording of this event
watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV

Howard Marks began his distinguished career in the financial industry in 1969 as an equity research analyst and subsequently, Citicorp's Director of Research. From 1978 to 1985 he was Vice President and senior portfolio manager in charge of convertible and high yield securities at Citicorp (and one of Michael Milken's first customers). He became Chief Investment Officer of the powerhouse TCW Group and in 1995 founded his own company, Oaktree Capital Management LLC, which boasts a $55 billion investment portfolio and is regarded as one of the elite investment firms in the US. In building Oaktree, Marks amassed his own fortune. These days, however, he is more interested in dispensing his wisdom on the markets and is one of the best and most-widely-read writers in the financial community. The Wall Street Journal, in "The Memo All the Investment World Should Read," remarked that Howard Marks's memos are as eagerly anticipated and carefully read as Warren Buffet's shareholder letters.

Mr. Marks holds a B.S.Ec. degree cum laude from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania with a major in Finance, and an M.B.A. in Accounting and Marketing from the Graduate School of Business of the University of Chicago, where he received the George Hay Brown Prize. He is a CFA® charterholder and a Chartered Investment Counselor. Mr. Marks chairs the Investment Board of the University of Pennsylvania.


RealArts@Penn features The Onion writer Joe Garden

5:00PM in the Arts Cafe

introduced by: Anthony DeCurtis
listen: to an audio recording of this event
watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV

Joe Garden is currently a features editor at The Onion, where he created the characters Jim Anchower and Jackie Harvey. He has co-written three books, The Dangerous Book For Dogs, The Devious Book For Cats and The New Vampire's Handbook: A Guide for the Recently Turned Creature of the Night. He has also been a contributing writer for the PBS animated children's program WordGirl, has appeared in the film Bad Meat, and was the voice of Phil Cabinet in the Aqua Teen Hunger Force episode "Hypno-Germ."

Friday, 2/26

A lunchtime reading by poets Kaia Sand and Jules Boykoff

12:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

RSVP: wh@writing.upenn.edu or call (215) 746-POEM
introduced by: Pattie McCarthy
co-sponsored by: the TalkPoets
watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV
listen: to an audio recording of this reading on its PennSound page


Kaia Sand's book, Remember to Wave, was just released by Tinfish Press. This collection investigates political geography in Portland, Oregon, which takes the form of a poetry walk. She is also the author of a poetry collection, interval (Edge Books 2004), and co-author with Jules Boykoff of Landscapes of Dissent: Guerrilla Poetry and Public Space (Palm Press 2008). Sand has created several chapbooks through the Dusie Kollektiv, which also published her wee book, lotto. Her poems comprise the text of two books in Jim Dine's Hot Dreams series (Steidl Editions 2008). She is currently working on The Happy Valley Project, multi-media collaborations investigating housing foreclosures and finance.

Jules Boykoff is the author of Hegemonic Love Potion (Factory School, 2009) and Once Upon a Neoliberal Rocket Badge (Edge Books, 2006). His political writing includes Landscapes of Dissent: Guerrilla Poetry & Public Space (co-authored with Kaia Sand) (Palm Press, 2008), Beyond Bullets: The Suppression of Dissent in the United States (AK Press, 2007), and The Suppression of Dissent: How the State and Mass Media Squelch USAmerican Social Movements (Routledge, 2006). His writing has appeared recently in The Nation, The Guardian, and Wheelhouse Magazine. He teaches politics and writing at Pacific University and lives in Portland, Oregon.

Saturday, 2/27

Sunday, 2/28