November 2012

Thursday, 11/1

Feminism/s Presents: Kate Zambreno

supported by the Fund for Feminist Projects

6:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV
listen: to an audio recording of this event

Kate Zambreno is the author of the novels O Fallen Angel and Green Girl. Her critical memoir Heroines, revolving around her obsession with the wives and mistresses of modernisms, will be published by Semiotext(e)'s Active Agents series in the fall, and was first incubated on her blog Frances Farmer is My Sister. She is at work on a new essay collection circling around feminism and desire entitled Slapping Clark Gable. She lives in a cottage in Carrboro, North Carolina, with her partner John Vincler and her puppy Genet.


Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

  • 9 AM - 10:30 AM in Room 202: WRIT 030.312 with Dana Walker
  • 10:30 AM - 12 PM in Room 202: Peer Tutoring with Valerie Ross
  • 12 PM - 1:30 PM in Room 202: WRIT 027.301 with Emil Weissboard
  • 1:30 PM - 4:30 PM in Room 202: ENG 117 with Anthony DeCurtis
  • 1:30 PM - 4:30 PM in Room 209: ENG 135 with Max Apple
  • 1:30 PM - 3 PM in the Arts Cafe: ENG 88 with Al Filreis

Friday, 11/2

Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

Saturday, 11/3

Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

Sunday, 11/4

Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

Monday, 11/5

A poetry reading by Aracelis Girmay

6:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

hosted by: Greg Djanikian
co-sponsored by: Creative Writing
watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV
listen: to an audio recording of this event

Aracelis Girmay's debut poetry collection, Teeth, was published by Curbstone Press and was awarded the GLCA New Writers Award. Her poems have been published in Black Renaissance Noir, Gulf Coast, A Public Space, and Callaloo, among other journals. A Cave Canem Fellow, she has received grants from the Jerome Foundation and the Watson Foundation. She is this year's recipient of the Isabella Gardner Poetry Award and was recently awarded a literature fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. Girmay is an Acentos Foundation board member and a contributing editor for The Massachusetts Review. She received her MFA from NYU in 2003 and is now on the faculty of both Drew University's Poetry MFA program and Hampshire College's School of Interdisciplinary Arts. Girmay grew up in Santa Ana, California and currently lives in New York, New York.


Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

  • 11 AM - 12:30 PM in Room 202: WRIT 002.307 with Michelle Taransky
  • 2 PM - 5 PM in Room 202: ENG 157 with Sam Apple
  • 2 PM - 5 PM in Room 209: ENG 123 with Elizabeth Van Doren

Tuesday, 11/6

STAT OF THE UNION

In Order to Form a More Perfect Pie Chart

The Brodsky Gallery Opening

6:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

hosted by: Lily Applebaum

After you cast your vote, come join us for STAT OF THE UNION, the official Writers House election party, where we will unveil an exhibit of original infographics. Handmade by Writers House staffers with the resources of the Common Press, these pie charts, bar graphs, and scatter plots push statistical representations to their absurd but inevitable ends, as suggested by the ever-more stat-happy news media. So come watch election coverage with the Writers House crew, with homemade snacks and refreshments aplenty!

Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

  • 9 AM - 10:30 AM in Room 202: WRIT 030.312 with Dana Walker
  • 10:30 AM - 12 PM in Room 202: Peer Tutoring with Valerie Ross
  • 12 PM - 1:30 PM in Room 202: WRIT 027.301 with Emil Weissboard
  • 1:30 PM - 4:30 PM in Room 202: ENG 122 with Max Apple
  • 1:30 PM - 4:30 PM in Room 209: ENG 145 with Stephen Fried
  • 1:30 PM - 3 PM in the Arts Cafe: ENG 88 with Al Filreis

Wednesday, 11/7

Creative Ventures Presents:

"Changing the Way We Drink" with Becca Goldstein

6:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV
listen: to an audio recording of this event

"Through my Creative Ventures Capital project 'Changing the Way We Drink,' I plan to educate the community about locally produced spirits. I was inspired by learning about the growing number of American craft distilleries during my summer internship at a start up whiskey distillery in Brooklyn. I plan to compile research about the current local spirits renaissance by touring distilleries and interviewing distillers, speaking to government officials, surveying bars and restaurants, and visiting archives. My hope is to make new information about this movement accessible to the public by documenting my progress through social media. Now, drinking responsibly is also about drinking locally and sustainably."

Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

  • 11 AM to 12:30 PM in Room 202: WRIT 002.307 with Michelle Taransky
  • 2 PM to 5 PM in Room 202: ENG 156 with Paul Hendrickson
  • 2 PM to 5 Pm in Room 209: ENG 010 with Jamie-Lee Josselyn

Thursday, 11/8

A poetry reading by Nathalie Anderson, Joan Landis, and Elaine Terranova

Eva and Leo Sussman Poetry Program

6:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

hosted by: Greg Djanikian
co-sponsored by: Creative Writing
watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV
listen: to an audio recording of this event

Nathalie F. Anderson is the author of Following Fred Astaire (1998 Washington Prize from The Word Works), Crawlers 2005 McGovern Prize from Ashland Poetry Press), Quiver, and Stain (soon to arrive). Anderson's poems have appeared in such journals as APR's Philly Edition, Atlanta Review, Denver Quarterly, DoubleTake, Inkwell Magazine, Journal of Mythic Arts, Louisville Review, Natural Bridg, The New Yorker, Nimrod, North American Review, Paris Review, Prairie Schooner, The Recorder, Southern Poetry Review, and Spazio Humano. Her work has been commissioned for the Ulster Museum's collection of visual art and poetry titled A Conversation Piece; for the catalogue of the retrospective exhibition Sarah McEneany at the Institute of Contemporary Art of the University of Pennsylvania; and for the artist's press book titled Ars Botanica published by ELM Press. Her work appears in The Book of Irish American Poetry From the Eighteenth Century to the Present, and her poems have twice been solicited for inclusion in The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror. She has authored libretti for three operas – The Black Swan; Sukey in the Dark; and an operatic version of Arthur Conan Doyle's A Scandal in Bohemia – all in collaboration with the composer Thomas Whitman. A 1993 Pew Fellow, she serves currently as Poet in Residence at the Rosenbach Museum and Library, and she teaches at Swarthmore College, where she is a Professor in the Department of English Literature and directs the Program in Creative Writing.

Elaine Terranova is the author of five collections of poetry: Dames Rocket (Penstroke Press); Not To: New and Selected Poems (Sheep Meadow Press); The Dog's Heart(Orchises Press); Damages (Copper Canyon Press); and The Cult of the Right Hand (Doubleday), winner of the 1990 Walt Whitman Award ; and the chapbooks, Elegiac: Footnotes to Rilke’s Duino Elegies and Toward Morning/Swimmers. Her poems have appeared in The New Yorker, The American Poetry Review, Prairie Schooner, Virginia Quarterly Review, and Ploughshares. Her translation of Euripides’ Iphigenia at Aulis is part of the Penn Greek Drama Series (University of Pennsylvania Press). The recipient of numerous awards, including a Pew Fellowship in the Arts, the Pushcart Prize, and a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, Terranova teaches writing at the Community College of Philadelphia and in the MFA Program in Creative Writing at Rutgers, Camden.

Joan Hutton Landis is the author of That Blue Repair. Landis earned her masters degree at Wesleyan University and her Ph.D. at Bryn Mawr. In 1977 Landis began teaching at the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia, helping to form the core curriculum, initiating both poetry and fiction workshops and becoming the first Chair of the Liberal Arts Department. Her critical work has appeared in Hamlet Studies, The Upstart Crow, the Shakespeare Quarterly, and Salmagundi, among others. Her most recent poetry has appeared in Parnassus: Poetry in Review, The Gettysburg Review,Poetry, Salmagundi, and Spoon River. Landis’s poem, “That Blue Repair” inspired a musical piece for strings and cello, composed by Chris Rogerson and commissioned by the New York Youth Orchestra, which was performed at Carnegie Hall and received a rave review in the NY Times. Rogerson has been commissioned by Orchestra 2001, to set another of Landis’s poems for performance in 2013.

Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

  • 9 AM - 10:30 AM in Room 202: WRIT 030.312 with Dana Walker
  • 10:30 AM - 12 PM in Room 202: Peer Tutoring with Valerie Ross
  • 12 PM - 1:30 PM in Room 202: WRIT 027.301 with Emil Weissboard
  • 1:30 PM - 4:30 PM in Room 202: ENG 117 with Anthony DeCurtis
  • 1:30 PM - 4:30 PM in Room 209: ENG 135 with Max Apple
  • 1:30 PM - 3 PM in the Arts Cafe: ENG 88 with Al Filreis

Friday, 11/9

Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

Saturday, 11/10

A celebration of Marjorie Perloff

Featuring short speeches by Al Filreis, Charles Bernstein, Stuart Curran, Joe Wittreich, Bob Perelman, Rachel Blau Duplessis and Marjorie Perloff

5:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV
listen: to an audio recording of this event

On the occasion of her induction into the American Philosophical Society in Philadelphia, we celebrated Marjorie Perloff at Writers House. Friends, admirers, and supporters joined in for toasts, kind words, and reflections on her work and many acheivements.

Marjorie Perloff is one of the foremost American critics of modern and contemporary poetry. Her work has been concerned with describing, evaluating and—at times—advocating for the writing of experimental and avant-garde poets and relating them to major currents of modernist and postmodernist activity in all the arts.

She is the author of many books and hundreds of essays. Radical Artifice: Writing Poetry in the Age of Media appeared in 1991 and sought to situate the flight from "transparency" (language aiming to appear "natural," to sound like "real" talk) to "artifice" (poetic language foregrounding its own artificiality). Her 1981 book, The Poetics of Indeterminacy: Rimbaud to Cage, examines the continuities from modernist to postmodernist culture, a concept that has remained central in her work. Perloff's most recent book, Unoriginal Genius: Poetry by Other Means in the New Century, explores contemporary poetry's embrace of "unoriginal" writing through choice, framing, and language. Marjorie Perloff's energies as a writer and teacher have been devoted to creating a public for the work of writers whom others have wanted to dismiss as too difficult, obscure, or marginal. Her own writing is anything but that; as the critic Frank Kermode has said, Marjorie Perloff is fun to read. She writes to explain, and communicates through vivid juxtapositions, formulations, and examples. She is Professor Emerita of English at Stanford University and is currently Scholar-in-Residence at the University of Southern California.

The poet Peter Barry has called Perloff "a theorist whose work has maintained its distinctiveness in the face of the rapid homogenization of literary criticism and theory ... We need her distinctive voice more than ever as literary theory enters its third millennium."

Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

Sunday, 11/11

Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

Monday, 11/12

A lunch talk with Amanda Bennett

Povich Journalism Program

12:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

hosted by: Dick Polman
watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV
listen: to an audio recording of this event

Amanda Bennett is an executive editor at Bloomberg News, directing special projects and investigations, and the former co-chair of the Pulitzer Prize Board. She previously served as editor of The Philadelphia Inquirer, editor of The Herald-Leader (Lexington, KY), managing editor for The Oregonian (Portland,OR), and Atlanta Bureau chief (among numerous other posts) at The Wall Street Journal. In 1997 Bennett shared the Pulitzer Prize for national reporting with her Journal colleagues, and in 2001 she led an Oregonian team to a Pulitzer for public service. In addition to her memoir The Cost of Hope, she is the author of previous books, including In Memoriam, The Quiet Room, The Man Who Stayed Behind, and Death of the Organization Man.


A meeting of the Writers House Planning Committee (the "Hub")

5:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

rsvp: jalowent@writing.upenn.edu

From the time of its founding in 1995-1996, the Kelly Writers House has been run more or less collectively by members of its community. Our original team of intrepid founders—the group of students, faculty, alumni, and staff who wanted to create an independent haven for writers and supporters of contemporary writing in any genre—took for themselves the name "the hub." "Hub" was the generic term given by Penn's Provost, President, and other planners who hoped that something very innovative would be done at 3805 Locust Walk to prove the viability of the idea that students, working with others, could create an extracurricular learning community around common intellectual and creative passions. To this day, the Writers House Planning Committee refers to itself as "the hub"—the core of engaged faculty, student, staff, and alumni volunteers from whom the House's creative energy and vitality radiates.


Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

  • 11 AM - 12:30 PM in Room 202: WRIT 002.307 with Michelle Taransky
  • 2 PM - 5 PM in Room 202: ENG 157 with Sam Apple
  • 2 PM - 5 PM in Room 209: ENG 123 with Elizabeth Van Doren

Tuesday, 11/13

A lunch talk with Sam Stein

Povich Journalism Program

11:30 AM in the Arts Cafe

hosted by: Stephen Fried
rsvp: email wh@writing.upenn.edu
watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV
listen: to an audio recording of this event

Sam Stein is a Political Reporter at the Huffington Post, based in Washington, D.C. Previously he has worked for Newsweek magazine, the New York Daily News and the investigative journalism group Center for Public Integrity. Stein was the first new media journalist to ever ask a question at a White House news conference, and is generally considered one of the very first important online journalists. He is a frequent political analyst for MSNBC and CNN. He has a masters from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and is a graduate of Dartmouth College.

A reading by John Jeremiah Sullivan

Povich Journalism Program

6:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

hosted by: Jay Kirk
watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV
listen: to an audio recording of this event

John Jeremiah Sullivan is a contributing writer to The New York Times Magazine and the southern editor of The Paris Review. He has written for Harper's, GQ, and the Oxford American, and is the author of two books: Blood Horses and Pulphead: Essays. Time magazine listed Pulphead as one of the best books of 2011, praising its "compulsive honesty and wildly intelligent prose." The New Yorker described it as "literary freedom in action." Sullivan is the winner of a Whiting Writers' Award, two National Magazine Awards, a Pushcart Prize, and a fellowship at the NYPL's Center for Scholars and Writers. Born in Louisville, Kentucky, he lives in Wilmington, North Carolina, with his wife and daughters.


Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

  • 9 AM - 10:30 AM in Room 202: WRIT 030.312 with Dana Walker
  • 10:30 AM - 12 PM in Room 202: Peer Tutoring with Valerie Ross
  • 12 PM - 1:30 PM in Room 202: WRIT 027.301 with Emil Weissboard
  • 1:30 PM - 4:30 PM in Room 202: ENG 122 with Max Apple
  • 1:30 PM - 4:30 PM in Room 209: ENG 145 with Stephen Fried
  • 1:30 PM - 3 PM in the Arts Cafe: ENG 88 with Al Filreis

Wednesday, 11/14

Speakeasy open mic night

Poetry, Prose, and Anything Goes!

7:30 PM in the Arts Cafe

watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV
listen: to an audio recording of this event

Our Speakeasy Open Mic Night is held once a month. We invite writers to share their work, or the work of others, in our Arts Cafe. Speakeasy welcomes all kinds of readings, performances, spectacles, and happenings. Bring your poetry, your guitar, your dance troupe, your award-winning essay, or your stand up comedy to share. You should expect outrageous (and free!) raffles for things you didn't know you needed, occasional costumes, and, of course, community members who love writing.

Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

  • 11 AM to 12:30 PM in Room 202: WRIT 002.307 with Michelle Taransky
  • 2 PM to 5 PM in Room 202: ENG 156 with Paul Hendrickson
  • 2 PM to 5 Pm in Room 209: ENG 010 with Jamie-Lee Josselyn

Thursday, 11/15

Springsteen fest

6:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV
listen: to an audio recording of this event

featuring:

  • Al Filreis Introduction
  • Greg Djanikian on "Born in the USA"
  • Grace Ambrose on "Spirit in the Night"
  • Dan Sheehan on "Matamoras Banks"
  • Max McKenna on "Candy's Room"
  • Anthony DeCurtis on "Tunnel of Love"
  • Matt Chylak on "Backstreets"
  • Nate Chinen on "The Promise"
  • Zoe Straus on "Youngstown"
  • Al Filreis on "Land of Hope and Dreams"
  • Al Filreis, Greg Djanikian, and Anthony DeCurtis join forces once again to bring us our second Song Symposium, this time on the works of Bruce Springsteen. One by one, this Writers House musical triumvirate and six of their friends will lead us through an analysis of a different song by New Jersey’s poet laureate. Like last year, you can expect a mix of crowd-pleasers and deep cuts as these nine cut loose and follow Bruce’s runaway body of work along all of its hairpin turns and detours, from Asbury Park to Nebraska, 57th Street to Highway 9.

    Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

    • 9 AM - 10:30 AM in Room 202: WRIT 030.312 with Dana Walker
    • 10:30 AM - 12 PM in Room 202: Peer Tutoring with Valerie Ross
    • 12 PM - 1:30 PM in Room 202: WRIT 027.301 with Emil Weissboard
    • 1:30 PM - 4:30 PM in Room 202: ENG 117 with Anthony DeCurtis
    • 1:30 PM - 4:30 PM in Room 209: ENG 135 with Max Apple
    • 1:30 PM - 3 PM in the Arts Cafe: ENG 88 with Al Filreis

    Friday, 11/16

    Martin Seligman

    watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV
    listen: to an audio recording of this event

    Martin E.P. Seligman, Ph.D., works on positive psychology, learned helplessness, depression, and on optimism and pessimism. He is currently Zellerbach Family Professor of Psychology and Director of the Positive Psychology Center at the University of Pennsylvania. He is well known in academic and clinical circles and is a best-selling author. His bibliography includes twenty books and 200 articles on motivation and personality. Among his better-known works are Learned Optimism (Knopf, 1991), What You Can Change & What You Can't (Knopf, 1993), The Optimistic Child (Houghton Mifflin, 1995), Helplessness (Freeman, 1975, 1993) and Abnormal Psychology (Norton, 1982, 1988, 1995, with David Rosenhan. His most recent book is the best-selling, Authentic Happiness (Free Press, 2002). Seligman is the recipient of two Distinguished Scientific Contribution awards from the American Psychological Association, the Laurel Award of the American Association for Applied Psychology and Prevention, and the Lifetime Achievement Award of the Society for Research in Psychopathology. He holds an honorary Ph.D. from Uppsala, Sweden and Doctor of Humane Letters from the Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology.

    Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

    Saturday, 11/17

    Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

    Sunday, 11/18

    Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

    Monday, 11/19

    Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

    • 11 AM - 12:30 PM in Room 202: WRIT 002.307 with Michelle Taransky
    • 2 PM - 5 PM in Room 202: ENG 157 with Sam Apple
    • 2 PM - 5 PM in Room 209: ENG 123 with Elizabeth Van Doren

    Tuesday, 11/20

    Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

    • 9 AM - 10:30 AM in Room 202: WRIT 030.312 with Dana Walker
    • 10:30 AM - 12 PM in Room 202: Peer Tutoring with Valerie Ross
    • 12 PM - 1:30 PM in Room 202: WRIT 027.301 with Emil Weissboard
    • 1:30 PM - 4:30 PM in Room 202: ENG 122 with Max Apple
    • 1:30 PM - 4:30 PM in Room 209: ENG 145 with Stephen Fried
    • 1:30 PM - 3 PM in the Arts Cafe: ENG 88 with Al Filreis

    Wednesday, 11/21

    Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

    • 11 AM to 12:30 PM in Room 202: WRIT 002.307 with Michelle Taransky
    • 2 PM to 5 PM in Room 202: ENG 156 with Paul Hendrickson
    • 2 PM to 5 Pm in Room 209: ENG 010 with Jamie-Lee Josselyn

    Thursday, 11/22

    Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

    • 9 AM - 10:30 AM in Room 202: WRIT 030.312 with Dana Walker
    • 10:30 AM - 12 PM in Room 202: Peer Tutoring with Valerie Ross
    • 12 PM - 1:30 PM in Room 202: WRIT 027.301 with Emil Weissboard
    • 1:30 PM - 4:30 PM in Room 202: ENG 117 with Anthony DeCurtis
    • 1:30 PM - 4:30 PM in Room 209: ENG 135 with Max Apple
    • 1:30 PM - 3 PM in the Arts Cafe: ENG 88 with Al Filreis

    Friday, 11/23

    Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

    Saturday, 11/24

    Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

    Sunday, 11/25

    Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

    Monday, 11/26

    Live at the Writers House Presents Emerging Philadelphia Writers

    7:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

    hosted by: Michaela Majoun

    LIVE AT THE WRITERS HOUSE is a long-standing collaboration between the Kelly Writers House and WXPN FM (88.5). Six times annually between September and April, Michaela Majoun hosts a one-hour broadcast of poetry, music, and other spoken-word art, along with one musical guest, all from our Arts Cafe onto the airwaves at WXPN. LIVE is made possible by generous support from BigRoc. For more information, contact Producer Alli Katz (katza@writing.upenn.edu).

    Philadelphia native Martha Cooney, StoryUP! Founder and Director, holds a B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania and an M.S. in Early Childhood Education from City College New York, where she studied educational theater and conducted research on children’s storytelling. Martha teaches preschool in the Philadelphia area and is founder of the Kids & Teens Program at the Philly Improv Theater. She has taught with Philadelphia Young Playwrights, Theatre Horizon, ArtsTech children’s creative theater, Mighty Writers, and Musehouse: A Center for the Literary Arts. Martha has led programs for children and families in New York City and Belfast, Northern Ireland. Martha performs on the Philly Improv Theater house team Hot Dish and as a Guest Storyteller with First Person Arts Story Slams. Martha writes stories and scripts for children and has had work published in Cricket children’s magazine and a variety of other publications, and is a member of the Milestones local chapter of the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators.

    Juliet Hope Wayne was named Best Comedian in Philadelphia by Philadelphia Magazine. A long time storyteller at the Moth, she was the first female to win the Moth Grandslam in New York City. She's Philadelphia's first grandslam winner with First Person Arts storytelling series. She has been heard by over a million listeners of the Moth podcast and the Moth Radiohour on NPR. She's toured with The Unchained Tour, a traveling storytelling show founded by Moth founder George Dawes Green, that travels throughout the south.

    Matthew Jakubowski's fiction has been published by 3:AM Magazine, Necessary Fiction, Barrelhouse (online), and Apiary, and is forthcoming from Heavy Feather Review in January 2013. His literary criticism appears frequently in venues such as The Millions, Bookforum.com, and The Cleveland Plain Dealer. He lives in West Philadelphia with his wife and son and is at work on a novel and a collection of experimental fiction.

    Max McKenna’s fiction has appeared or is forthcoming in Philadelphia Stories, Apiary (Print and Online), Cartographer: a Literary Review, and First Stop Fiction. He has contributed essays to the Journal of Modern Literature, The Millions, and Full Stop, among others. He works at the Kelly Writers House in Philadelphia where he co-coordinated, among other projects, a chapbook of writings from Philadelphias that never were.

    From banjo to bass drum, piano to pedal, Elliott Harvey's meditative instrumentation builds beneath his dream-ridden lyrics and layered vocals. Working fluidly with artists of many forms, Elliott’s recordings and performances often feature guest musicians from across the country.

    Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

    • 11 AM - 12:30 PM in Room 202: WRIT 002.307 with Michelle Taransky
    • 2 PM - 5 PM in Room 202: ENG 157 with Sam Apple
    • 2 PM - 5 PM in Room 209: ENG 123 with Elizabeth Van Doren

    Tuesday, 11/27

    A lunch talk with Jina Moore

    Povich Journalism Program

    11:30 AM in the Arts Cafe

    hosted by: Stephen Fried
    rsvp: wh@writing.upenn.edu
    watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV
    listen: to an audio recording of this event

    Jina Moore is a freelance journalist and multimedia producer who covers human rights, Africa, and foreign affairs. She is a regular correspondent of the Christian Science Monitor and her work has also appeared in Foreign Policy, Newsweek, The Columbia Journalism Review, and elsewhere.

    James Surowiecki

    Weber Symposium

    5:30 PM in the Arts Cafe

    hosted by: Al Filreis
    watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV
    listen: to an audio recording of this event

    Established by Stacey (W'85) and Jeff Weber, the annual Weber Symposium strives to emphasize the importance of clarity in writing about finance and economics by featuring guest speakers whose work reflects this commitment to lucid prose. Series guests have included: Joe Nocera, Andrew Ross Sorkin, and Lawrence Summers.

    James Surowiecki has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 2000. He writes The Financial Page.

    Surowiecki came to The New Yorker from Slate, where he wrote the Moneybox column. He has also been a contributing editor at Fortune and a staff writer at Talk. Previously, he was the business columnist for New York magazine. He has contributed to The Wall Street Journal, Wired, the New York Times Magazine, the Washington Post, and Lingua Franca, and has written on subjects ranging from Silicon Valley to college basketball. His book, The Wisdom of Crowds: Why the Many Are Smarter than the Few and How Collective Wisdom Shapes Business, Economies, Societies, and Nations, was published in 2004.

    Here is a link to his much-admired TED talk on when social media became news: http://www.ted.com/talks/james_surowiecki_on_the_turning_point_for_social_media.html.


    Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

    • 9 AM - 10:30 AM in Room 202: WRIT 030.312 with Dana Walker
    • 10:30 AM - 12 PM in Room 202: Peer Tutoring with Valerie Ross
    • 12 PM - 1:30 PM in Room 202: WRIT 027.301 with Emil Weissboard
    • 1:30 PM - 4:30 PM in Room 202: ENG 122 with Max Apple
    • 1:30 PM - 4:30 PM in Room 209: ENG 145 with Stephen Fried
    • 1:30 PM - 3 PM in the Arts Cafe: ENG 88 with Al Filreis

    Wednesday, 11/28

    Whenever We Feel Like It: Caryl Pagel and Paul Legault

    6:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

    hosted by: Michelle Taransky
    watch: a video recording of this event via KWH-TV
    listen: to an audio recording of this event

    The Whenever We Feel Like It Reading Series is put on by Committee of Vigilance members Michelle Taransky and Emily Pettit. The Committee of Vigilance is a subdivision of Sleepy Lemur Quality Enterprises, which is the production division of The Meeteetzee Institute.

    Caryl Pagel is the author of Experiments I Should Like Tried At My Own Death, a collection of poetry published by Factory Hollow Press. Her poems and essays have appeared in AGNI, Devil's Lake, Jacket2, and Thermos, among other journals. She is the co-founder and editor of Rescue Press and a poetry editor at jubilat.

    Paul Legault is the co-founder of the translation press Telephone Books and the author of three books of poetry: The Madeleine Poems (Omnidawn, 2010), The Other Poems (Fence, 2011), and The Emily Dickinson Reader (McSweeney's, 2012). He's here.

    Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

    • 11 AM to 12:30 PM in Room 202: WRIT 002.307 with Michelle Taransky
    • 2 PM to 5 PM in Room 202: ENG 156 with Paul Hendrickson
    • 2 PM to 5 Pm in Room 209: ENG 010 with Jamie-Lee Josselyn

    Thursday, 11/29

    Playwrights You Wish You Knew

    7:00 PM in the Arts Cafe

    hosted by: Alexa Bryn

    Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)

    • 9 AM - 10:30 AM in Room 202: WRIT 030.312 with Dana Walker
    • 10:30 AM - 12 PM in Room 202: Peer Tutoring with Valerie Ross
    • 12 PM - 1:30 PM in Room 202: WRIT 027.301 with Emil Weissboard
    • 1:30 PM - 4:30 PM in Room 202: ENG 117 with Anthony DeCurtis
    • 1:30 PM - 4:30 PM in Room 209: ENG 135 with Max Apple
    • 1:30 PM - 3 PM in the Arts Cafe: ENG 88 with Al Filreis

    Friday, 11/30

    Meetings and classes (may require registration or permission; email for more info)